On May 5, Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin vetoed legislation that would have expanded consumer payday lending in the state. Oklahoma House Bill 1913—known as the “Oklahoma Small Loan Act”—would have allowed lenders to offer installment loans with terms no longer than 12 months and interest rates up to 17 percent per month. Fallin’s veto message to the House expressed concerns about adding another high interest loan product without eliminating or restricting existing payday loan products: “House Bill 1913 adds yet another level of high interest borrowing (over 200% APR) without terminating or restricting access to existing payday loan products.” Fallin further asserted that “some of the loans created by this bill would be more expensive than the current loan options.” Four years prior, Fallin vetoed Senate Bill 817 “due to [her] concerns with the frequency [with which] low-income families in Oklahoma were using these lending options, and the resulting high cost of repayment to those families.” In the veto message, Fallin requested that the state legislature seek advice from her office as well as consumer advocates and mainstream financial institutions if it decides to revisit these issues. Under Section 11 of Article 6 of the Oklahoma Constitution, the legislation can still be enacted if two-thirds of the members of both legislative chambers vote to override the veto. In earlier votes, the legislation fell short of the two-thirds threshold, passing the Oklahoma House 59-31 and the Senate by a 28-16 margin.

Notably, last year, the CFPB published proposed rules in the Federal Register affecting payday, title, and certain other high-cost installment loans (see previously posted Special Alert).