Key Points:

  • House Democrats press ahead with Build Back Better Act, including $550 billion in climate-related funding.
  • The House will send the package to the Senate to continue negotiations over controversial provisions.
  • Most climate-related provisions are likely to remain in the bill following Senate negotiations.

House Democrats are poised to pass their most ambitious climate-related legislation when they vote to send the Senate the latest version of the Build Back Better Act (BBB) in the coming days. The $1.75 trillion bill currently provides about $550 billion in climate-related funding, including historic investments in electric vehicle charging infrastructure; extended and new tax credits for clean energy; grants for states, localities and tribes to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; a fee on methane emissions; incentives to reduce emissions from industrial and manufacturing facilities; reforms to oil and gas activities on public lands; and funding for many other climate-related programs. BBB’s climate provisions do not contain any of the high-profile proposals from earlier in the year, such as a price on carbon, a carbon border adjustment tax or a clean electricity payment program. Instead, the legislation focuses primarily on providing funding to reduce emissions through state and local programs and providing incentives to drive private-sector investments.

As the House passes BBB along party lines, all eyes will continue to be on Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV), who may or may not provide the crucial 50th vote necessary for Democrats to send the legislation back to the House for final approval and then to President Biden for his signature. Senator Manchin has not endorsed any particular approach to the BBB’s climate provisions, but has generally opposed proposals he views as punitive against the fossil fuel industry. Instead, he has called for provisions that focus on incentivizing innovations to solve the climate crisis without putting unreasonable constraints on the fossil fuel industry in West Virginia. It is unclear if Sen. Manchin is willing to support the methane fee, but most of the provisions he opposes have already been stripped out of the original $3.5 trillion House bill. Most surviving climate-related provisions are likely to remain intact with only marginal changes.

The biggest obstacle to Senate passage of the climate provisions remains Sen. Manchin’s and Sinema’s overall support or opposition to the size and scope of the BBB legislation as a whole. Sen. Sinema has reportedly been supportive of the current climate provisions. There is no predictable timeline for Senate action on BBB. Moderate Democrats, including Sen. Manchin, want to review the Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) forthcoming report on the effect of BBB on the debt and deficit before they will support the bill. Ultimately, many Democrats are eager to deliver a victory for themselves and President Biden, but Sen. Manchin does not have the same sense of urgency. He has stated numerous times that he has concerns about the effect the $1.75 trillion bill will have on inflation and the debt. Progressives will hope to take advantage of any momentum coming out of the UN’s Climate Change Conference in Glasgow.

The following provides a summary of all climate, energy and environment provisions broken down by committee of jurisdiction included in the final version (as of November 5) of the BBB:

Committee on Ways and Means

Extension and modification of credit for electricity produced from certain renewable resources. The provision extends the production tax credit (PTC), which allows energy producers to claim a credit based on electricity produced from renewable energy resources. The provision provides a base credit rate of 0.5 cents/kilowatt hour, or a bonus credit rate of 2.5 cents/kilowatt hour. The PTC for the following facilities is extended through the end of 2026: landfill gas (municipal solid waste), trash (municipal solid waste), qualified hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy facilities, and geothermal. The PTC for wind energy is increased to the full applicable credit rate through the end of 2026. The PTC for solar energy is revived and extended through 2026.

Extension and modification of energy credit. The provision extends the investment tax credit (ITC), which allows taxpayers to claim a tax credit for the cost of energy property. In most cases, the provision extends the credit for property for which construction begins by the end of 2026. The provision provides a base credit rate of six percent of the basis of energy property or a bonus credit rate of 30 percent of the basis of energy property. The provision provides that the base and bonus credit rates have been extended to solar energy property, geothermal energy property and heat pumps, fiber-optic solar equipment, fuel cell property, micro turbine property, combined heat and power property, small wind energy property, biogas property, waste energy recovery property and offshore wind property. Newly eligible property under the expanded ITC includes energy storage technology, biogas property, micro grid controllers, dynamic glass and linear generators. The ITC for geothermal heat pumps, combined heat and power property, and waste energy recovery property is extended to provide a six percent base credit rate or a 30 percent bonus credit rate through the end of 2031. The base credit rate phases down to 5.2 percent for facilities that commence construction in 2032 and 4.4 percent for facilities that commence construction in 2033. The bonus credit rate phases down to 26 percent in 2032 and 22 percent in 2033. These credit rates apply with respect to facilities placed into service after December 31, 2021.

Increase in energy credit for solar and wind facilities placed in service in connection with low-income communities. This provision provides for an enhanced incentive for solar and wind facilities qualifying for the Section 48 ITC with respect to which the Secretary makes an allocation of environmental justice solar and wind capacity limitation. Property eligible for the credit includes energy storage technology related to such solar or wind property. The annual capacity limitation is 1.8 gigawatts for each calendar year 2022 through 2026, and zero for calendar years thereafter. The annual capacity limitation shall be increased by the amount of any unused allocations from the preceding calendar year. Any excess capacity limitation after 2026 shall be carried over to the annual capacity limitation under Section 48F.

Elective payment for energy property and electricity produced from certain renewable resources. The provision allows taxpayers to elect to be treated as having made a payment of tax equal to the value of the credit they would otherwise be eligible for under the programs listed below. The provision provides that rather than opting to carry forward credits to years when their credits can offset their tax liability, taxpayers can elect to treat the amount of credit as a payment of tax. This allows entities with little or no tax liability to accelerate utilization of these credits, including tax-exempt and tribal entities.

  • Section 48 ITC
  • Section 45 PTC
  • Section 45Q credit for carbon capture and sequestration
  • Section 30C alternative fuel vehicle refueling property credit
  • Section 48C advanced energy project credit
  • Section 48D investment credit for transmission property
  • Section 45W zero-emission nuclear power production credit
  • Section 45X clean hydrogen production credit
  • Section 48E advanced manufacturing investment credit
  • Section 45AA advanced manufacturing production credit
  • Section 45BB clean electricity production credit
  • Section 48F clean electricity investment credit
  • Section 45CC clean fuel production credit.

Investment credit for electric transmission property. This provision provides for a tax credit for the basis of qualifying electric transmission property placed in service by the taxpayer. Qualifying electric transmission property is defined as tangible, depreciable property which is an electric transmission line, capable of transmitting electricity at a voltage of not less than 275 kilowatts and has a transmission capacity of not less than 500 megawatts or related transmission property.

Extension of credit for carbon oxide sequestration. The provision extends the credit for carbon oxide sequestration facilities that begin construction before the end of 2031. To qualify for the credit, direct air capture facilities must capture no less than 1,000 metric tons of carbon oxide per year. Electricity generating facilities must capture no less than 18,750 metric tons of carbon oxide and 75 percent of total carbon emissions. Other facilities must capture no less than 12,500 metric tons of carbon oxide. The provision provides a base credit rate of $17 or a bonus credit rate of $85 per metric ton of carbon oxide captured for geological storage, and a base credit rate of $12 or a bonus credit rate of $60 per metric ton of carbon oxide captured and utilized for an allowable use by the taxpayer. The provision provides an enhanced credit for direct air capture facilities at a base rate of $36 or a bonus rate of $180 per metric ton of carbon oxide captured for geological storage, and base rate of $26 or a bonus rate of $130 per metric ton of carbon captured and utilized for an allowable use by the taxpayer.

Green energy publicly traded partnerships. The provision expands the definition of qualified income for publicly traded partnerships from certain income derived from minerals and natural resources to include income derived from green and renewable energy. These additions include income from certain activities related to energy production eligible for the PTC, property eligible for the ITC, renewable fuels, and energy and fuel from carbon sequestration projects eligible for credits under Section 45Q.

Zero-emission nuclear power production credit. The provision provides a credit for the production of electricity from a qualified nuclear power facility. The provision provides a base credit rate of 0.3 cents/kilowatt hour and a bonus credit rate of 1.5 cents/kilowatt hour for electricity produced by the taxpayer and sold to an unrelated person during the taxable year. The credit is reduced as the sale price of such electricity increases. Under the credit reduction formula, the credit with respect to any qualified nuclear power facility for any taxable year is reduced (but not below zero) by 16 percent of the excess of the gross receipts (excluding certain state and local zero-emissions grants) from any electricity produced and sold by such facility over the product of 2.5 cents times the amount of electricity sold during the taxable year.

Extension of incentives for biodiesel, renewable diesel and alternative fuels. The provision extends the income and excise tax credits for biodiesel and biodiesel mixtures at $1.00 per gallon through 2026. The provision extends the $0.10-per-gallon small agri-biodiesel producer credit through the end of 2031. The provision extends the $0.50 per gallon excise tax credits for alternative fuels and alternative fuel mixtures through 2026.

Extension of second generation biofuel incentives. The provision extends the second generation biofuel income tax credit through 2026.

Sustainable aviation fuel credit. Beginning in 2023, this provision provides a refundable blenders tax credit for each gallon of sustainable aviation fuel sold as part of a qualified fuel mixture. The value of the credit is determined on a sliding scale, equal to $1.25 plus an additional $.01 for each percentage point by which the lifecycle emissions reduction of such fuel exceeds 50 percent. To claim the credit, taxpayers must certify that such fuel reduces lifecycle GHG emissions by at least 50 percent, determined in accordance with the requirements of the most recent Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization with the support of the United States, or under any similar methodology which satisfies the criteria under Section 211(o)(11) of the Clean Air Act (CAA). This provision terminates the $1.00 Section 40A tax credit for aviation fuel produced from biodiesel beginning after December 31, 2022.

Clean hydrogen. This provision creates a new tax credit for the production of clean hydrogen produced by a taxpayer at a qualified clean hydrogen facility beginning in 2022 during the 10-year period beginning on the date such facility is placed in service. The amount of the credit is equal to the applicable percentage of the base rate of $0.60 or the bonus rate of $3.00, indexed to inflation, multiplied by the volume (in kilograms) of clean hydrogen produced by the taxpayer at a qualified facility during such taxable year.

Extension, increase and modifications of nonbusiness energy property credit. The provision extends the nonbusiness energy property credit to property placed in service before the end of 2031. Beginning in 2022, the provision modifies and expands the credit, including by:

  • Increasing the percentage of the credit for installing qualified energy efficiency improvements from 10 percent of the cost to 30 percent.
  • Replacing the lifetime cap on credits with a $1,200 annual credit limitation and a $600 limitation per-item of property, which excludes expenditures for geothermal and air source heat pumps and biomass stoves.
  • Updating various standards and associated limits to reflect advances in energy efficiency and removing eligibility of roofs, advanced main air circulating fans and certain windows.
  • Requiring that manufacturers and taxpayers comply with reporting the identification number of certain property placed into service in order to access the credit.
  • Expanding the credit to cover the costs of home energy audits, allowing a credit of 30 percent of such costs up to a maximum credit of $150.

Residential energy efficient property. The provision extends the credit for the cost of qualified residential energy efficient property expenditures, including solar electric, solar water heating, fuel cell and small wind energy, and geothermal heat pumps. The provision extends the full 30 percent credit for eligible expenditures through the end of 2031. The credit then phases down to 26 percent in 2032 and 22 percent in 2033. The credit expires after the end of 2033.

Energy efficient commercial buildings deduction. Starting in 2022, the provision updates and expands the energy efficient commercial buildings deduction by increasing the maximum deduction, determined on a sliding scale. It also changes this maximum from a lifetime cap to a three-year cap. The maximum value of the base deduction is $.50 per square foot, increased by $0.02 per square foot for every percentage point by which the designed energy cost savings exceed 25 percent against the reference standard, not to exceed $1.00 per square foot. The value of the bonus deduction is $2.50 per square foot, increased by $.10 per square foot for every percentage point by which designed energy cost savings exceed 25 percent against the reference standard, not to exceed $5.00 per square foot.

Extension, increase and modifications of new energy efficient home credit. The provision extends the Section 45L new energy efficient home credit through 2031. Single family and Manufactured Homes. In the case of new homes acquired after 2022, which are eligible to participate in the ENERGY STAR Residential New Construction Program or Manufactured Homes Program, the provision provides a $2,500 credit for energy efficient single family and manufactured new homes meeting certain energy star requirements. This provision provides a higher tier credit of $5,000 credit for eligible single family and manufactured new homes certified as a zero energy ready under the Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home Program. This provision provides a higher tier base credit of $1,000 or a bonus credit of $5,000 for eligible multifamily units certified as a zero energy ready under the Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home Program.

Modifications to income exclusion for conservation subsidies. The provision excludes from gross income water conservation, storm water management, and wastewater management subsidies provided by public utilities, state or local governments, or storm water management providers.

Credit for qualified wildfire mitigation expenditures. This provision creates a tax credit equal to 30 percent of qualified expenditures for individuals and businesses who participate in a qualified state-based wildfire resiliency program. The provision applies to expenditures paid or incurred after the date of enactment.

Refundable new qualified plug-in electric drive motor vehicle credit for individuals. This provision provides for a refundable income tax credit for new qualified plug-in electric drive motor vehicles placed into service by the taxpayer during the taxable year. The amount of credit allowed by this provision with respect to a qualified vehicle is equal to the base amount of $4,000 plus an additional $3,500 for vehicles placed into service before January 1, 2027, with battery capacity no less than 40 kilowatt hours and a gasoline tank capacity not greater than 2.5 gallons, and for vehicles with battery capacity of no less than 50 kilowatt hours thereafter. The amount credit allowed for a qualified vehicle is increased by $4,500 if the final assembly of the vehicle is at a facility in the United States which operates under a union-negotiated collective bargaining agreement. The amount of credit allowed for a qualified vehicle is increased by $500 if the vehicle model are powered by battery cells which are manufactured within the United States. The amount of credit allowed for a qualified vehicle is limited to 50 percent of its purchase price. Beginning in 2027, this credit shall only apply with respect to vehicles for which final assembly is within the United States.

Credit for previously owned qualified plug-in electric drive motor vehicles. The provision creates a new refundable credit for the purchase of used battery and fuel-cell electric cars after date of enactment through 2031. Buyers can claim a base credit of $2,000 for the purchase of qualifying used electric vehicles (EVs), with an additional $2,000 based on battery capacity. The credit is capped at the lesser of $4,000 or 50 percent of the sale price. To qualify for this credit, used EVs must generally meet the eligibility requirements in the existing Section 30D credit for new EVs, not exceed a sale price of $25,000, and be a model year that is at least two years earlier than the date of sale.

Credit for qualified commercial electric vehicles. This provision creates a new credit for qualified commercial electric vehicles placed into service by the taxpayer. The amount of credit allowed by this provision with respect to a qualified commercial electric vehicle is equal to 30 percent of the cost of such vehicle. A leasing company may elect to determine the credit using the structure of the individual credit under section 36C if the vehicle is leased to an individual. Tax-exempt entities have the option of electing to receive direct payments.

Qualified fuel cell motor vehicles. This provision extends the credit for the purchase of a qualified fuel cell motor vehicle through 2031, but only with respect to vehicles not of a character subject to depreciation. Beginning on January 1, 2022, commercial fuel cell vehicles otherwise eligible for this credit will be eligible for the new Section 45Y credit for qualified commercial electric vehicles.

Alternative fuel refueling property credit. The provision extends the alternative fuel vehicle refueling property credit through 2031. Beginning in 2022, the provision expands the credit for zero-emissions charging and refueling infrastructure by providing a base credit of six percent for expenses up to $100,000 and four percent for allowable expenses in excess of such limitation (i.e., it allows a credit for expenses beyond the limit if certain requirements are met). The provision provides an alternative bonus credit level of 30 percent for expenses up to $100,000 and 20 percent thereafter.

Reinstatement and expansion of employer provided fringe benefits for bicycle commuting. This provision eliminates the temporary suspension of the exclusion for qualified bicycle commuting benefits and increases the maximum benefit from $20 per month to $81 per month. This provision expands the definition of qualified benefit to include the direct or indirect provision of qualified commuting property by an employer and employer reimbursement of expenses incurred for the purchase, financing, lease, rental (including bikeshare), improvement, or storage of qualified commuting property if the employee uses such property for travel between the employee’s residence and place of employment or mass transit facility connecting an employee to place of employment.

Credit for certain new electric bicycles. This provision provides for a 30 percent refundable tax credit for qualified electric bicycles placed into service before January 1, 2026. Beginning in 2022, taxpayers may claim a credit of up to $900 for electric bicycles placed into service by the taxpayer for use within the United States

Extension of the advanced energy project credit. The provision revives the Section 48C qualified advanced energy property credit, allowing the Secretary to allocate an additional $5 billion in credits for each of calendar years 2022 through 2023 and $1.875 billion for each of calendar years 2024 through 2031. $800 million in credits for each of calendar years 2022 through 2023 and $300 million in credits for each of calendar years 2024 through 2031 are reserved for projects in automotive communities. Additionally, $800 million in credits for each of calendar years 2022 through 2023, and $300 million for each calendar year 2024 through 2031, are reserved for projects located in energy communities. Similar requirements to the original credit apply, with a few notable changes. Qualifying advanced energy project includes a project which re-equips a manufacturing facility with equipment designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 20 percent.

Advanced manufacturing investment credit. The provision creates an investment tax credit worth up to 25 percent for advanced manufacturing facilities, and an advanced manufacturing production tax credit for eligible components. All taxpayers are eligible for an ITC of at least five percent. Taxpayers paying prevailing wages and utilizing registered apprenticeship programs are eligible for an elevated ITC of 25 percent. The investment tax credit is available for property for the manufacturing of semiconductors and semiconductor tooling equipment, including buildings and equipment that are integral to such manufacturing that commences construction before January 1, 2026.

Advanced manufacturing production credit. The provision provides a production credit for each eligible component which is produced and sold. Eligible components include solar polysilicon, wafers, cells and modules, and wind blades, nacelles, towers and offshore foundations. The credits are generally provided on a mass or watt capacity basis. The amount credit allowed for eligible components is increased by 10 percent if the final assembly of such components is at a facility in the United States which operates under a union-negotiated collective bargaining agreement. The credits are provided for eligible components produced and sold before January 1, 2027. For components sold after that date, the credit is reduced by 25 percent each year, and is unavailable for components sold in 2030 and beyond.

Qualified environmental justice program credit. The provision creates a capped refundable competitive credit of $1 billion for each year from 2022 through and including 2031 to institutions of higher education for environmental justice (EJ) programs. The base credit is 20 percent of costs to be spent within five years by the receiving institution. Programs with material participation from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) are eligible for a higher credit of 30 percent. Qualifying EJ programs shall be designed to address or improve data about environmental stressors for the primary purpose of improving or facilitating the improvement of health and economic outcomes of individuals residing in low-income areas or areas that experience, or are at risk of experiencing, multiple exposures to qualified environmental stressors.

Reinstatement of Superfund. This provision reinstates the Hazardous Substance Superfund Financing Rate on crude oil and imported petroleum products at the rate of 16.4 cents/per gallon, indexed to inflation, and reinstates the tax on taxable chemicals. This provision is made effective after December 31, 2021.

Clean electricity production and investment credits. The provision creates an emissions-based incentive that would be neutral and flexible between clean electricity technologies. Taxpayers are able to choose between a PTC under Section 45BB or an ITC under Section 48F, which is provided based on the carbon emissions of the electricity generated – measured as grams of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) emitted per KWh generated. Any power facility of any technology can qualify for the credits, so long as the facility’s carbon emissions are at or below zero.

Increase in clean electricity investment credit for facilities placed in service in connection with low-income communities. This provision provides for an enhanced incentive for facilities qualifying for the Section 48F ITC (not including certain facilities that produce electricity through combustion or gasification) with respect to which the Secretary makes an allocation of environmental justice capacity limitation. This is similar to the enhanced incentive under Section 48 for solar and wind facilities placed in service in connection with low-income communities.

Cost recovery for qualified facilities, qualified property and grid improvement property. This provision provides that any facility described in the clean electricity production credit and any qualified property or grid improvement property described in the clean electricity investment credit shall be treated as five-year property under the General Depreciation System for purposes of Section 168 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Clean fuel production tax credit. The provision creates a technology-neutral incentive for the domestic production of clean fuels. The level of the incentive depends on the lifecycle carbon emissions of a given fuel. Lifecycle emissions take into account the “well to wheel” emissions profile, from production of the feedstock for the fuel through to its use in a vehicle. Fuels may qualify for the credit if the fuel’s lifecycle emissions are at least 25 percent less than the current U.S. nationwide average. Zero-emission fuels qualify for a base incentive of $.20 per gallon or gallon equivalent. Sustainable aviation fuel that meets certain ASTM standards, and is not derived from palm oil, qualifies for a base incentive of $.35 per gallon or gallon equivalent. Qualifying production is restricted to production in the United States of fuel that is used or sold.

Committee on Energy and Commerce

Clean heavy-duty vehicles. $5 billion is appropriated to carry out Section 132 of the CAA, of which $2 billion is for recipients proposing to replace eligible heavy-duty vehicles serving communities located in nonattainment areas. The legislation also establishes a program to make awards of grants and rebates to replace Class 6 and Class 7 heavy-duty vehicles with zero-emission vehicles.

Grants to reduce air pollution at ports. The bill provides $3.5 billion for the purchase and installation of zero-emission equipment and technology at ports, as well as the development of climate action plans at ports, and requires that 25 percent of investments are made at ports in nonattainment areas.

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund. This section provides $29 billion to support the rapid deployment of low- and zero-emission technologies. It invests approximately $20 billion in nonprofit financing institutions designed to support projects that reduce or avoid emissions by leveraging investment from the private sector. And it requires that 40 percent of these investments benefit low-income and disadvantaged communities. This section also allows funds to be used to establish or expand state and local financing programs that deploy low- and zero-emission technologies. In addition, it invests $7 billion in state, local and nonprofit programs to install zero-emission distributed technologies in low-income and disadvantaged communities, as well as $2 billion in state, local and nonprofit efforts to install zero-emission vehicle charging or fueling infrastructure.

Collaborative Community Wildfire Air Grants. Provides the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with $150 million to assist communities in developing and implementing collaborative community plans to prepare for, reduce risks of and mitigate the health and environmental effects of wildfire smoke.

Diesel emissions reductions. Provides the EPA $60 million for Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) grants for projects addressing diesel emissions from goods movement facilities (e.g., airports, railyards and distribution centers) and from vehicles servicing those facilities.

Funding to address air pollution. This provision provides $280.5 million to the EPA, of which $230.5 million is for air quality monitoring via grants and other activities authorized under CAA Sections 102, 103 and 105. Additionally, $45 million is to carry out specified sections of the CAA with respect to GHGs, and $5 million is for grants to states to adopt and implement GHG and zero-emission standards for mobile sources pursuant to CAA Section 177.

Funding to address air pollution at schools. This section appropriates $50 million to the EPA to monitor and reduce air pollution at public schools in low-income and disadvantaged communities under CAA Sections 103 and 105.

Low Emissions Electricity Program. This section provides $87 million to the EPA to carry out CAA Section 135 and directs that $68 million be used to help educate consumers, support low-income and disadvantaged communities, and offer technical assistance to industry, as well as state and local governments, with respect to reductions in GHG emissions that result from domestic electricity generation and use. It further directs that $1 million be used to assess the emission reductions anticipated to occur over the next decade, and that $18 million be used to ensure the assessed reductions are achieved.

Funding for Section 211 of the Clean Air Act. This section provides the EPA $15 million to carry out CAA Section 211, of which $5 million shall be for tests, protocols, analyses and evaluations regarding environmental and public health effects and lifecycle emissions of transportation fuels, and $10 million shall be for grants to support investments in advanced biofuels.

Funding for implementation of the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act. This section provides $38.5 million to the EPA to carry out the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act, of which $3.5 million is to deploy new implementation and compliance tools, and $15 million is for competitive grants for reclaim and innovative destruction technologies.

Funding for enforcement technology and public information. This section appropriates $50 million to the EPA, of which $37 million is to update the EPA’s Integrated Compliance Information System, $7 million is for grants to states, Indian Tribes and air pollution control agencies to update their systems, and $6 million is to acquire or update inspection software used by the EPA, states, Indian Tribes and air pollution control agencies (Section 30112, Greenhouse Gas Corporate Reporting). Additionally, this section provides the EPA $5 million to support enhanced standardization and transparency of corporate climate action commitments and plans, and progress toward meeting such commitments and implementing such plans.

Environmental Product Declaration Assistance Program. This section provides the EPA $250 million to establish and carry out an Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) Assistance program to support development and enhanced standardization and transparency of environmental product declaration for construction materials and products.

Methane Emissions Reduction Program. This section provides the EPA $775 million for grants, rebates, contracts and loans to reduce methane emissions from petroleum and natural gas systems. This section also requires the EPA Administrator to establish waste emissions thresholds for petroleum and natural gas facilities, and to impose and collect a charge on waste emissions that exceed such thresholds. The charge starts at $900 per ton of methane in 2023 and ramps up to $1,500 per ton by 2025.

Climate Pollution Reduction Grants. This section provides $5 billion to the EPA to carry out CAA Section 137, as added by this section. Section 137 provides $250 million for grants for the costs of developing plans to reduce GHG air pollution and directs the EPA to make such a grant to at least one eligible entity in each state. Section 137 further provides $4.75 billion for the EPA to competitively award grants to implement GHG air pollution reduction plans. Section 137(c) establishes an application requirement and terms and conditions. Section 137(d) defines an eligible entity to mean a state, air pollution control agency, municipality, Indian Tribe, or a group of one or more such entities.

Low-embodied carbon labeling for construction materials for transportation projects. This section provides the EPA $100 million to develop and carry out a program to identify and label, based on environmental product declarations, low-embodied carbon construction materials and products used for transportation projects.

Grants to reduce waste in communities. This section provides $190 million for investments in waste reduction infrastructure, incentives and related activities located in, or directly serving, low-income and disadvantaged communities.

Environmental and Climate Justice Block Grants. This section provides $3 billion for investments in community led projects in disadvantaged communities and community capacity building centers to address disproportionate environmental and public health harms related to pollution and climate change.

Home Energy Performance-Based, Whole-house Rebates and Training Grants. This section provides the Department of Energy (DOE) with funding to institute guidelines and administer funding for state energy offices to provide rebates for whole-house energy saving retrofits. It appropriates $360 million for contractor training grants to support home energy efficiency retrofits and $5.89 billion for state energy offices to provide rebates for retrofits; specifies rebate amounts for single-family and multifamily energy efficiency retrofits; and provides that home energy efficiency retrofit rebates for high-efficiency natural gas heating, ventilation, air conditioning and cooling (HVAC) systems and water heaters are eligible for six years after the date of enactment.

High-Efficiency Electric Home Rebate Program. This section amends Section 124 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT05) to appropriate $2.226 billion for DOE to provide homeowners and owners of multifamily buildings rebates for qualifying electrification projects, and $3.8 billion for rebates carried out in tribal communities or for low- or moderate-income households. It also specifies rebate amounts for the program, and appropriates $4 million for community and consumer education and outreach and $220 million to administer the program and provide technical support.

Critical facility modernization. This section appropriates $500 million for DOE to provide funding to states for the purposes of resiliency, energy efficiency, renewable energy and grid integration improvements at public and nonprofit buildings.

Assistance for latest and zero building energy code adoption. This section appropriates funding for State Energy Program grants to assist states and local communities adopting updated building energy codes for residential and commercial buildings. It appropriates $100 million for the adoption and implementation of the latest building energy codes, and $200 million for the adoption and implementation of zero energy and equivalent stretch codes.

Zero-Emissions Vehicle Infrastructure Grants. This section appropriates $600 million to DOE to carry out a program to provide financial assistance through State Energy Programs for Level 2 publicly accessible EV supply equipment. This section also appropriates $200 million for direct current fast charging infrastructure, and $200 million for hydrogen fueling equipment through State Energy Programs. The financial assistance provided in this section targets the buildout of infrastructure in rural, underserved and disadvantaged areas.

Funding for Department of Energy Loan Programs Office. This section provides the Secretary of Energy with authority to make commitments up to a total principal amount of $40 billion to guarantee loans for eligible projects under the EPACT05 Section 1703. The section further appropriates $3.6 billion for the costs of guarantees made under Section 1703.

Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing. This section appropriates $3 billion to the Secretary of Energy for the costs of providing direct loans under Energy Independence and Security Act section 136, known as the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing program, to produce advanced technology medium and heavy-duty vehicles, trains or locomotives, maritime vessels, aircraft or hyperloop technology. This section also removes the cap on the amount of direct loans the Secretary can issue under this program.

Domestic Manufacturing Conversion Grants. This section appropriates $3.5 billion to the Secretary of Energy for domestic manufacturing conversion grants relating to domestic production of plug-in electric hybrid, plug-in electric drive, and hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles and components of such vehicles under EPACT05 Section 712.

Energy Community Reinvestment Financing. This section appropriates $5 billion to the Secretary of Energy for the cost of providing financial support to the Energy Community Reinvestment Financing Program under EPACT05 Section 1706, as added by this subtitle. Section 1706(b) directs the Secretary to establish a program to provide financial support to eligible entities for the purpose of enabling low-carbon reinvestments in energy communities. Section 1706(c) establishes an application process, while 1706(d) sets out fees and other requirements, and 1706(e) defines terms used in this section.

Tribal Energy Loan Guarantee Program. This section appropriates $200 million to the Secretary of Energy to carry out the tribal energy loan guarantee program. This section also enables that program to guarantee 100 percent of unpaid principal and interest and to access the Federal Financing Bank, and increases the cap on loan guarantees under the program to $20 billion.

Transmission line and intertie incentives. This section appropriates $2 billion to DOE to provide incentives for the purpose of constructing new high-capacity transmission lines and for upgrading interties between the various interconnections.

Grants to facilitate the siting of interstate electricity transmission lines. This section appropriates $800 million to DOE for the issuance of grants to siting authorities, including state, local or tribal governmental entities, for the purpose of studying and analyzing the impacts of covered transmission projects, examining alternate transmission siting corridors, hosting negotiations regarding covered transmission projects, participating in regulatory proceedings, and for economic development activities for communities that may be affected by the construction and operation of a covered transmission project.

Organized Wholesale Electricity Market Technical Assistance Grants. This section appropriates $40 million to DOE for the purpose of providing states with technical assistance and grants to evaluate forming, participating in, expanding, or improving organized wholesale electricity markets.

Interregional and offshore wind electricity transmission planning, modeling and analysis. This section appropriates $100 million to DOE to perform transmission planning, modeling and analyses regarding the development of interregional and offshore wind transmission projects and to convene stakeholders to address the development of such transmission projects.

Advanced Industrial Facilities Deployment Program. This section appropriates $4 billion to DOE to provide financial assistance, on a competitive basis, to projects for installing and implementing advanced industrial technology at energy-intensive industrial and manufacturing facilities.

Committee on Natural Resources

Tribal Climate Resilience. This section provides $441 million to the Director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) for tribal climate resilience and adaptation programs, $19.6 million for BIA fish hatchery operations and maintenance programs, and $9.4 million for the administrative costs of carrying out tribal climate resilience and adaptation programs and fish hatchery operations and maintenance programs.

Native Hawaiian Climate Resilience. This subsection provides $49 million to the Senior Program Director of the Office of Native Hawaiian Relations to carry out climate resilience and adaptation activities that serve the Native Hawaiian community by providing funding and technical assistance and $1 million for administrative costs.

Tribal Electrification Program. This section provides $294 million to the Director of the BIA for the provision of electricity to unelectrified tribal homes through renewable energy systems, as well as the transition of electrified tribal homes to renewable energy systems and associated retrofitting necessary to install renewable energy systems. It also provides $6 million for the administrative costs associated with the program.

Investing in Coastal Communities and Climate Resilience. This section provides $6 billion to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to remain available until September 30, 2026, to provide direct funding, grants, cooperative agreements and technical assistance to states, tribes, the District of Columbia, nonprofit organizations, local governments, and institutions of higher education for projects that conserve, restore, and protect coastal and marine habitats to increase climate resilience of coastal communities or sustain coastal and marine resource-dependent communities.

Environmental and Climate Data Collection. This section provides $65 million to the Council on Environmental Quality, to remain available until September 30, 2026, to support data collection efforts relating to disproportionate negative environmental harms and climate impacts and the cumulative impacts of pollution and temperature rise, to track disproportionate burdens and cumulative impacts, and to ensure mapping and screening tool efforts are accessible to community-based organizations and community members.

Office of Insular Affairs Climate Change Technical Assistance. This section provides $29.1 million to the Office of Insular Affairs to offer technical assistance for climate change planning, mitigation, adaptation and resilience to the U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States under its jurisdiction.

Renewable energy leasing on the Outer Continental Shelf. This section raises revenue by directing the Department of the Interior to hold offshore wind lease sales in federal waters in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic off the coast of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

Offshore wind for the Territories. This section raises revenue by requiring the Department of the Interior to hold offshore wind lease sales in federal waters around American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Repeal of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Oil and Gas Program. This section repeals Section 20001 of the 2017 Tax Act (P.L. 115-97), which established the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge oil and gas leasing program, cancels the leases sold in January 2021 and returns the payments to the lessees.

Protection of the Eastern Gulf, Atlantic and Pacific Coasts. This section permanently bans new offshore oil and gas leasing along the entire Atlantic and Pacific coasts and in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico.

Onshore fossil fuel royalty rates. This section raises the onshore royalty rates to 18.75 percent for all new oil, gas and coal leases. The federal onshore oil and gas royalty rate of 12.5 percent has not been adjusted in over a century and is considerably below royalty rates charged by states.

Offshore oil and gas royalty rate. This section raises the minimum offshore royalty rate to 14 percent for all new oil and gas leases.

Oil and gas minimum bid. This section raises the current onshore oil and gas minimum bid from $2 to $10 and requires it to be indexed to inflation. The current minimum bid amount for onshore oil and gas leases has not been adjusted since 1987.

Deferred coal bonus payments. This section repeals the requirement that the Bureau of Land Management offers at least 50 percent of total acreage for coal leasing in any one year under a deferred bonus payment system.

Fossil fuel rental rates. This section raises the onshore rental rate for oil and gas leases from their current values of $1.50 for the first five years and $2 for the second five years, to $3 for the first two years and $5 in each subsequent year.

Fossil fuel lease term length. This section shortens the primary onshore oil and gas lease term from 10 to five years, and the primary coal lease term from 20 to 10 years.

Expression of Interest fee. This section requires the Secretary of the Interior to charge a cost-recovery fee to each person that submits an oil and gas Expression of Interest and requires the fee to be at least $15 per acre and not more than $50 per acre. The fee would be regularly adjusted to reflect inflation and if the Secretary determines a higher fee is necessary to enhance financial returns to the United States.

Elimination of noncompetitive leasing. This section prohibits noncompetitive oil and gas leasing on public lands. Currently, if a parcel of public land does not receive a bid during a competitive auction, it is made available for noncompetitive leasing on a first-come, first-serve basis the following business day, at which point companies can obtain a lease without having to pay a bonus bid, only paying the yearly rental fee and an administrative fee.

Oil and gas bonding requirements. This section requires the Secretary of the Interior to publish a final rule that requires oil and gas leaseholders on public land to provide the agency with a bond, surety or another financial instrument that ensures the complete and timely reclamation of the lease tract and restoration of land and waters adversely affected by lease operations.

Offshore oil and gas inspection fees. This section requires companies to pay annual user fees to cover the cost of the offshore oil and gas inspection program.

Onshore oil and gas inspection fees. This section requires companies to pay annual user fees to cover the cost of the onshore oil and gas inspection program.

Severance fees. This section requires the Secretary of the Interior to collect annual, nonrefundable fees on fossil fuels produced from federal lands and the Outer Continental Shelf in amounts of $0.50 per barrel of oil equivalent on oil and gas production and $2 per metric ton on coal production.

Idled well fees. This section requires oil and gas operators to pay an annual fee for idled wells on federal land. The yearly fee for each well increases the longer the well has been idle on federal land, starting at $500 for wells idle between one and five years, and ending at $7,500 for wells idle at least 15 years.

Annual pipeline owners fee. This section requires the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement to charge owners of offshore oil and gas pipelines annual fees of $10,000 per mile for pipelines in water depths of 500 feet or greater and $1,000 per mile for pipelines in water depths less than 500 feet.

Royalties on all extracted methane. This section eliminates the royalty waiver for natural gas produced and used on the lease and, with limited exceptions, requires royalties to be paid on all gas vented, flared or lost through leakage.

Elimination of royalty relief. This section prohibits the Secretary of the Interior from reducing, eliminating or suspending royalties for oil and gas leases on the Outer Continental Shelf and repeals the royalty relief authority under the Mineral Leasing Act.

Climate Adaptation Science Centers. This section provides $50 million to the United States Geological Survey for the National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers to provide localized information to help regions, states, tribes and local governments respond to climate change.

Committee on Oversight and Reform

General Services Administration Clean Fleets. This section would provide the General Services Administration (GSA) $2.995 billion for the procurement of electric vehicles and related costs.

United States Postal Service Clean Fleets. This section would provide the United States Postal Service $2.57355 billion to acquire electric vehicles and $3.41145 billion to purchase related support infrastructure, such as charging stations.

General Services Administration Emerging Technologies. This section would provide GSA $975 million for GSA’s environmental sustainability programs.

General Services Administration Procurement and Technology. This section would provide GSA $3.25 billion for the purchase of goods, services and systems to improve energy efficiency, promote the purchase of lower-carbon materials and reduce the carbon footprint.

Committee on Science, Space and Technology

Department of Energy Research, Development and Demonstration Activities. This section provides $1 billion for demonstration projects carried out by DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); provides $985 million to support research at the Office of Science; provides $10 million to carry out demonstration projects to reduce the environmental impacts of produced water; and provides $5 million for support of DOE’s Office of Economic Impact and Diversity to improve diversity across the Department’s research, development and demonstration activities.

Air quality and climate research. This section provides $100 million to the EPA to conduct air quality and climate research.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration climate research and development. Under this section, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is provided $85 million for climate research and development-related activities to understand, observe and mitigate climate change and its impacts; $30 million for investments in data management and processing to support climate research and development activities; $25 million for research and development to support the wildfire community and improve wildfire fighting operations; and $225 million for aeronautics research and development on sustainable aviation.

Oceanic and Atmospheric research and forecasting for weather and climate. This section provides $200 million to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to accelerate advancements in research, observations, modeling and dissemination related to weather, coasts, oceans and climate; provides $100 million to NOAA for competitive climate research grants; and provides $100 million to NOAA for development and dissemination of climate science information products and services, and for education and training, in support of climate adaptation activities.

Climate education. This section provides $20 million to NOAA for contracts, grants and technical assistance for education activities and materials to improve public understanding of climate change.

Computing capacity and research for weather, oceans and climate. $200 million is provided to NOAA to procure high performance computing, data processing capacity, data management and storage assets.

Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure

Community Climate Incentive Grant Program. This section provides $4 billion to reduce on-road GHG emissions; includes $50 million for the Federal Highway Administration to establish a GHG performance measure; establish an incentive structure for states that demonstrate significant carbon reductions; issue requirements, guidance and regulations necessary to ensure the reduction of on-road GHG emissions; and for other administrative expenses for the Federal Highway Administration to carry out the section. It also includes $950 million for incentive grants to states that make significant progress in reducing emissions or that adopt strategies to achieve net-zero surface transportation emissions by 2050, and $3 billion for nonstate entities for projects to reduce carbon emissions.

Alternative Fuel and Low-Emission Aviation Technology Program. This section provides $300 million for the Department of Transportation to support investments for projects that develop, demonstrate or apply low-emission aviation technologies or produce, transport, blend or store sustainable aviation fuels.

Climate Resilient Coast Guard Infrastructure. This section provides $650 million to the Coast Guard Procurement, Construction and Improvements account for the acquisition, design and construction of new, or replacement of, existing facilities impacted by climate change.

Port Infrastructure and Supply Chain Resilience. This section provides $600 million to the Maritime Administration for grants for projects to support supply chain resilience, reduction in port congestion, the development of offshore wind support infrastructure, environmental remediation and projects to reduce the impact of ports on the environment.

Alternative Water Source Project Grants. This section provides $125 million to support investment in alternative water source projects, including projects for groundwater recharge and potable reuse.

Sewer Overflow and Stormwater Reuse Municipal Grants. This section provides $1.85 billion to invest in sewer overflow and stormwater reuse projects, as well as provides for a greater federal cost share of projects that serve financially distressed communities.

Environmental review implementation. This section provides $50 million to the Federal Highway Administration for grants and administrative activities to facilitate the completion of environmental reviews for surface transportation projects.

Low-Carbon Transportation Materials Grants. This section provides $900 million to the Federal Highway Administration to reimburse the cost difference between low-embodied carbon construction materials and traditional materials in highway construction projects

Committee on Financial Services

Improving energy efficiency or water efficiency or climate resilience of affordable housing. This section provides $2 billion to establish a grant program for owners of federally assisted housing affordable housing to make energy efficiency upgrades, including electrification of systems and appliances, and installation of renewable energy types and improve property resiliency.

Investments in Rural Rental Housing. This section provides $2 billion to carry out new construction, make improvements to energy and water efficiency or climate resilience, to remove health and safety hazards, and to preserve housing under the Section 515 Rural Rental Housing and Section 514/516 Farm Labor Housing programs. This section also provides additional rental assistance to eligible households.

Strengthening Resilience Under National Flood Insurance Program. This section forgives $20.5 billion in National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) debt, directs an estimated $600 million to support flood mapping, and provides $600 million for FEMA to set up a means-tested affordability program to NFIP policyholders with household incomes up to 120 percent of area median income.

Committee on Agriculture

Non-Federal Land Forest Restoration and Fuels Reduction Projects and Research. This section, in part, provides funding for competitive grant programs under Section 13A of the Cooperative Forestry Assistance Act of 1978 in the following amounts: $250 million for a cost share to carry out climate mitigation or forest resilience practices in the case of underserved forest landowners; $250 million for grants to support the participation of underserved and small (separately) forest landowners in emerging private markets for climate mitigation or forest resilience. This section also provides funding for the forest inventory and analysis program established under Section 3(e) of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978 in the following amounts: $50 million for activities and tactics to accelerate and expand existing research efforts to improve forest carbon monitoring technologies to better predict changes in forest carbon due to climate change; $100 million to carry out recommendations, from a panel of relevant experts convened by the Secretary, regarding the current priorities and future needs of the forest inventory and analysis program with respect to climate change, forest health, sustainable wood products and increasing carbon storage in forests; and $50 million to provide enhancements to the technology managed and used by the forest inventory and analysis program.

State and Private Forestry Conservation Programs. This section appropriates $1.25 billion to provide competitive grants to States through the Forest Legacy Program established under Section 7 of the Cooperative Forestry Assistance Act of 1978 to acquire land and interests in land, with priority for grant applications that offer significant natural carbon sequestration benefits, or contribute to the resilience of community infrastructure, local economies or natural systems, or provide benefits to underserved populations; $2.5 billion to provide multi-year, programmatic competitive grants to eligible entities through the Urban and Community Forestry Assistance program established under Section 9(c) of the Cooperative Forestry Assistance Act of 1978 for tree planting and related activities to increase tree equity and community tree canopy and associated societal and climate co-benefits, with a priority for projects that benefit underserved populations; and $100 million for the acquisition of urban and community forests through the Community Forest and Open Space Program of the Forest Service.

Additional funding for electric loans for renewable energy. The bill provides $2.88 billion for making loans under Section 317 of the Rural Electrification Act of 1936, including for projects that store electricity that support the types of projects eligible for loans under section 317 of that Act.

Rural Energy Savings Program. The bill provides $200 million for the Rural Energy Savings Program authorized under Section 6407 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002.

Rural Energy for America Program. The bill provides $2.02545 billion for the Rural Energy for America Program established under Section 9007 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, nearly $304 million of which will be for financial assistance for underutilized renewable energy technologies and program technical assistance. This section also reduces the match requirement for grants awarded using funds provided under this section, from 75 percent to 50 percent.

Biofuel infrastructure and agriculture product market expansion. There is $960 million for competitive transportation grants. Specifically, these grants are for transportation fueling facilities and distribution facilities to install, retrofit or otherwise upgrade fuel dispensers or pumps and related equipment, storage tank system components, and other infrastructure required at a location for ethanol blends and biodiesel blends, and to build and retrofit distribution system for ethanol blends, traditional and pipeline biodiesel terminal operations, and home heating distribution centers or equivalent entities to blend biodiesel and to carry ethanol and biodiesel.

USDA assistance for rural electric cooperatives. The legislation provides $9.7 billion for grants and loans for certain electric cooperatives to purchase renewable energy or renewable energy systems, deploy renewable energy systems, or make energy efficiency improvements and to make grants for debt relief and other costs associated with terminating the use facilities operating on nonrenewable energy and related transmission assets.

Department of Agriculture Research Funding. $210 million is provided for the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research to carry out activities related to climate change and $30 million to the Office of the Chief Scientist to carry out advanced research and development relating to climate through the Agriculture Advanced Research and Development Authority (AGARDA). This section also provides funding in the following amounts to the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to carry out agricultural education, extension, and research relating to climate change: $210 million for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative; $120 million for the sustainable agriculture research education program; $60 million for the organic agriculture research and extension initiative; $5 million for the urban, indoor, and other emerging agricultural production research, education, and extension initiative; $5 million for centers of excellence at 1890 Institutions; $60 million for the specialty crop research and extension initiative; $80 million for cooperative extension under the Smith-Lever Act; $40 million for cooperative extension at 1890 Institutions; and $35 million for cooperative extension at 1994 Institutions.

Soil Conservation Assistance. This bill provides payments to producers who establish cover crops in their fields for soil health and to help address climate change. Such payments equal to $25 per acre, up to 1,000 acres per producer. With respect to any non-operating landowners, this section would pay $5 per acre to encourage or permit the operator to establish cover crops on the rented land.

Additional Agricultural Conservation Investments. This legislation provides additional funding for four existing farm bill conservation programs: the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), USDA conservation easements (ACEP), and the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) in the amounts of $9 billion, $4.1 billion, $1.7 billion, and $7.5 billion, respectively. In utilizing these additional funds to carry out these programs, the Secretary is generally required to prioritize the improvement of soil carbon, reduction of nitrogen losses, and the reduction or capture of GHG emissions.

Conservation Technical Assistance. $200 million is provided to the Natural Resources Conservation Service to provide conservation technical assistance; $50 million to USDA to promote climate change adaptation and mitigation through regional climate hubs; $600 million to the Natural Resources Conservation Service to engage in the quantification of carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions; and $100 million for administrative expenses.

Committee on Education and Labor

Corporation for National and Community Service and the National Service Trust. As a part of the total appropriation of $15.22 billion for the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) in support of national service activities, this section provides $6.915 million for national service programs to carry out projects related to climate resilience and mitigation, available over a five-year period for AmeriCorps State and National, and over an eight-year period for VISTA and NCCC. Furthermore, the section grants be made to entities that serve and have representation from low-income communities or communities experiencing adverse health and environmental conditions; programs utilize culturally competent and multilingual strategies; projects are carried out with community input and implemented by diverse participants from communities being served; and programs provide participants with workforce development opportunities; and provides match waivers, increased living and subsistence allowances, and benefits adjustments.

Workforce Development in Support of Climate Resilience and Mitigation. Provides $4.28 billion to the Department of Labor (DOL) over a five-year period through September 30, 2026, for employment and training activities in industry sectors or occupations related to climate resilience or mitigation and aligned with the activities described under the Corporation for National and Community Service and the National Service Trust. Relevant programs include:

  • $450 million over a five-year period for the YouthBuild program authorized under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including to improve or expand access to services, stipends, wages and benefits for YouthBuild participants, and for high-quality employment and training opportunities.
  • $450 million over a five-year period for the Job Corps program authorized under WIOA, for carrying out Job Corps activities, improving and expanding access to allowances and services for Job Corps participants, and for constructing, rehabilitating and acquiring Job Corps Centers.
  • $1 billion over a five-year period to create pre-apprenticeship programs that articulate to registered apprenticeship programs.
  • $150 million over a five-year period for partnerships between pre-apprenticeship programs and the programs funded by the CNCS to expand access to pre-apprenticeship programs.
  • $450 million over a five-year period to create or expand Registered Apprenticeship programs in climate related nontraditional apprenticeship occupations.
  • $350 million over a five-year period for pre-apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs that serve a high number or high percentage of individuals with barriers to employment, including individuals with disabilities, and nontraditional apprenticeship populations.
  • $1 billion over a five-year period for the Reentry Employment Opportunities program to support individuals who were formally incarcerated access employment and training activities.
  • $350 million over a five-year period for paid youth employment activities for in-school and out-of-school youth.