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Results: 1-10 of 65

Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL): A Statistical Analysis from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • May 16 2017

On Monday, May 15, 2017, representatives from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) provided an update on Canada’s


CRTC rules on application to reduce Canadian content
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • December 14 2010

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) denied two applications by a Canadian broadcaster to reduce the percentage of Canadian content it broadcasts on television to 55, which is 5 less than the current 60 minimum required by the Television Broadcasting Regulations


Telecommunications firms litigate internet speed advertising claims
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • September 30 2009

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice has denied a request for an injunction by Bell Canada, the largest Canadian internet service provider, but has made important comments on the merits of an underlying action relating to comparative advertising of internet speed claims


CRTC introduces a new framework for vertical integration
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • November 25 2011

On 21 September 2011, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) introduced a new regulatory policy addressing vertical integration in the broadcasting industry


CRTC announces review of earlier decisions relating to usage-based billing for wholesale internet services
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • March 22 2011

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) announced a comprehensive review of its recent decisions that would have permitted large internet distributors to adopt usage-based billing for wholesale customers (typically small internet service providers or ISPs) where such providers' residential users exceeded bandwidth caps, as determined by the distributors who generally own or operate the network infrastructure


Canada revises community television policy
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • November 9 2010

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) issued an updated policy requiring cable undertakings to ensure that at least half of the programming on their community access channels is created by community members, meaning that the original idea for a program must come from members of the community, who must also be involved in some aspect of the production, whether in front or behind the camera


CRTC rules on signal compensation regime for Canadian broadcasters
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • May 10 2010

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has issued a decision adopting in principle a new signal compensation regime in which private local Canadian broadcasters may elect to enter into negotiations with Canadian distributors to establish compensation for over-the-air signals


Canadian appeals court rules internet service providers are not broadcasters
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • September 6 2010

The Federal Court of Appeal (Court) has confirmed that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are not broadcasters


Supreme Court of Canada rules hyperlinks do not constitute defamatory statements
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Canada
  • January 12 2012

On 19 October 2011, the Supreme Court of Canada (the SCC) unanimously ruled that posting hyperlinks that included defamatory content on websites was not in itself defamatory


The global employer: the social media issue
  • Baker McKenzie
  • Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Netherlands, Russia, Singapore, Spain, United Kingdom, USA, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Mexico
  • September 25 2012

Social media is changing the way that we communicate, work and do business, wherever we are in the world