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HSR minimum threshold rises to record high of $66 million: results in increase of 4.1 from 2010
  • Dechert LLP
  • USA
  • January 26 2011

The Federal Trade Commission ("FTC") recently announced that the dollar-based thresholds applicable to the Hart-Scott-Rodino ("HSR") premerger notification program will be raised from the 2010 levels.


Jersey competition law a brief guide to mergers and acquisitions
  • Ogier
  • Jersey
  • December 13 2010

The Competition (Jersey) Law 2005 (the "Law") generally prohibits any agreements, business practices and conduct which substantially lessen competition in Jersey.


Price maintenance provisions of Competition Act decriminalized
  • Gowling WLG
  • Canada
  • January 13 2010

Recent amendments to Canada’s Competition Act have decriminalized the price maintenance provisions.


Enforcement agencies stand united against reverse payment patent settlements
  • Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • September 17 2009

Under the previous administration, the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) pursuit of antitrust challenges to patent settlements with so-called 'reverse payments' ran into at least two hurdles: (i) sceptical courts that refused to accept the FTC's theory for imposing antitrust liability; and (ii) 'friendly fire' from the Department of Justice, which was also concerned about the legality and economic effects of such patent settlements, but which viewed the FTC's proposed legal standard as too strict.


Public statements by FTC and DOJ indicate united front in aggressively challenging so-called “reverse payment” patent settlements
  • Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • July 30 2009

Under the prior administration, the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) pursuit of antitrust challenges to patent settlements with so-called reverse payments ran into at least two hurdles: (i) skeptical courts that refused to accept the FTC’s theory for imposing antitrust liability; and (ii) "friendly-fire" from a DOJ that also was concerned about the legality and economic effects of such patent settlements, but viewed the FTC’s proposed legal standard as too strict.





David Hamilton
  • Womble Bond Dickinson (US) LLP