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Employment and labor law in Tennessee
  • Bass, Berry & Sims PLC
  • USA
  • November 9 2018

A structured guide to employment and labor in Tennessee


Managing the employment relationship in Tennessee
  • Bass, Berry & Sims PLC
  • USA
  • April 27 2018

A structured guide to state specific laws, misclassification and employment contracts in Tennessee


DOL issues final rule revising the definition of “spouse” under the FMLA
  • Bass, Berry & Sims PLC
  • USA
  • February 25 2015

As of March 27, "spouse" under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) will include same-sex spouses for any legally recognized marriages based on


Termination during FMLA leave not unlawful
  • Bass, Berry & Sims PLC
  • USA
  • August 18 2014

Some employers believe that an employee who is out on FMLA cannot be disciplined or terminated. More savvy employers know that such a broad


Religious accommodation ruling confirms employment law trend toward candid interactive discussion
  • Bass, Berry & Sims PLC
  • USA
  • October 3 2013

A federal circuit court's recent ruling provides more evidence of a prevalent employment law trend that has developed in the last few decades. The


DOMA and the FMLA what should employer do “in the meantime”?
  • Bass, Berry & Sims PLC
  • USA
  • June 28 2013

The Supreme Court's Defense of Marriage Act ("DOMA") ruling will impact the "spouse" definition in the Family and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") (among


FMLA what information is sufficient to trigger employer’s duty to follow up
  • Bass, Berry & Sims PLC
  • USA
  • September 19 2012

Under the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), employers face significant challenges in understanding how much information from an employee is considered sufficient to trigger the employer’s duty to follow up.