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Article

Eversheds Sutherland (International) LLP | United Kingdom, European Union | 5 Nov 2012

Financial Institutions E-briefing: FSDR update:What constitutes inside information?

The recent case of Markus Geltl v Daimler AG has provided clarification on whether information relating to intermediate steps of protracted decision processes can constitute 'inside information' under the Market Abuse Directive.

Article

Fieldfisher LLP | European Union | 28 Sep 2012

Inside information: the disclosure of intermediate steps

The European Court of Justice ("ECJ") has provided useful clarification in a recent case, Geltl v Daimler AG (C-1911), as to whether information regarding the intermediate steps leading to a future uncertain event may potentially amount to inside information which is required to be disclosed immediately to the market

Article

Herbert Smith Freehills LLP | European Union | 29 Jun 2012

Market abuse: ECJ holds in Daimler case that steps preceding a decision may constitute inside information

In its judgment in the case of Markus Geltl v Daimler AG C-1911 yesterday, the European Court of Justice provided clarification on the requirement that information must be "of a precise nature" to be "inside information".

Article

Herbert Smith Freehills LLP | European Union | 28 Jun 2012

Market abuse ECJ holds in Daimler case that steps preceding a decision may constitute inside information

The European Court of Justice has today given judgment in the case of Markus Geltl v Daimler AG C-1911, holding that information about intermediate steps taken in the context of a protracted process leading towards a future event or circumstance can be precise, and therefore “inside information”; and a “reasonable expectation” that an event will occur means that there is a realistic prospect, not a high probability, that it will occur.

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