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Goodmans LLP | Canada | 23 Oct 2022

The Securitisation Law Review: Canada

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Goodmans LLP | Canada | 25 Aug 2022

The Real Estate M&A and Private Equity Review: Canada

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Goodmans LLP | Canada | 14 Jul 2022

The Lending and Secured Finance Review: Canada

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Goodmans LLP | Canada | 3 Apr 2022

The Public Competition Enforcement Review: Canada

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Goodmans LLP and Nassiry Law Inc | Canada | 1 Dec 2021

The Acquisition and Leveraged Finance Review: Canada

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Goodmans LLP | 22 Oct 2007

Ontario Court of Appeal Rules in Kennedy Electric Case

The Ontario Court of Appeals recently released its judgment in the Kennedy Electric Case. The decision is expected to give rise to debate over the extent to which the supply of certain types of machinery, assembly line and process equipment is lienable.
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Goodmans LLP | 13 Aug 2007

Duty of Fairness Revisited: The Double N Earthmovers Case

In any construction tendering process a balance must be struck between ensuring that the process is competitive and yet remains fair to all participating parties. In a recent decision regarding the tendering process, the courts were once again called upon to examine the fairness of the construction tendering process.
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Goodmans LLP | 18 Jun 2007

The Clock Is Ticking: New Statutory Limitation Periods in Ontario

Latent defects or deficiencies in buildings may be discovered long after the construction project is complete, thereby potentially exposing parties to indefinite liability. However, the Limitations Act 2002 sets out a new legislative regime, under which a party must commence a lawsuit within 15 years of the act or omission, regardless of when the negligence was discovered.
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Goodmans LLP | 11 Dec 2006

Impact of Design-Build Projects on Contract Interpretation

Within the construction industry there is always a potential tension between a general contractor and a subcontractor regarding the scope of work for which the subcontractor is responsible. If the parties to a contract are unable to resolve a conflict over one party's scope of work, the courts may be called upon to interpret and make the final decision regarding the parameters of a contract.
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Goodmans LLP | 11 Sep 2006

Potential Liability to Non-contracting Parties in Design-Build Tender

As the trend towards design-build construction projects continues, questions are being raised regarding the ability of members of a design-build team to make claims against the owner in respect of the owner's actions during the tender stage. The Federal Court of Canada recently reviewed the owner's duties to a design-build team when the owner fails to award the tender to the lowest compliant......
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