• The latest Brexit papers will pave the way for the UK to operate as an “independent trading nation”, Theresa May has said. The documents on post-Brexit trade and customs arrangements were published as the Prime Minister told MPs that “real and tangible progress” had been made in the negotiations since her high-profile Florence speech. (Sky News)
  • Six months of Brexit negotiations have passed with little progress. With British Prime Minister Theresa May due to address parliament, both sides have now said that the other is responsible for making the next move. As the EU and Britain started the fifth round of Brexit talks on Monday, both sides quarrelled over who was responsible for making the next move in the stalled negotiations over Britain’s departure from the bloc. Theresa May told the British parliament on Monday that a new agreement “will require leadership and flexibility, not just from us but from our friends, the 27 nations of the EU,” adding that “the ball is in their court.” (Deutsche Welle)
  • Britain will prepare to implement a customs, sales tax and excise regime that could operate in the event that no deal is reached with the European Union on its future trading relationships, the government said on Monday. The government document on plans for customs and trade said Britain believed it was prudent to prepare for every possible outcome and had set out its plans in a new piece of legislation. (Reuters)
  • A report drawn up by the Republic of Ireland’s customs authority has ruled out an open customs border with the North – effectively pouring cold water on UK plans for the frontier. The unpublished report, drawn up after the Brexit vote and obtained by Irish broadcaster RTE, spells out the huge logistical difficulties Britain leaving the EU will cause for trade on the island of Ireland. (Independent)
  • The battle within the cabinet to replace Theresa May as prime minister has left the UK an unreliable negotiating partner in the Brexit talks, unable to convince the EU that it will stick to any agreement it strikes, a former Irish prime minister has said. Speaking to business leaders in Brussels, John Bruton accused the British government of being hopelessly divided, and offering only a vague and impractical vision of what may come once the UK leaves the bloc in 2019. (Guardian)
  • Theresa May’s government will publish two white papers on customs and trade arrangements after Brexit, amid warnings from within government to expect two more thorny rounds of negotiations with the EU. A senior government official told the Guardian that ministers remained deeply pessimistic about the hopes of adequate progress in this round of talks or those that will start in November. (Guardian)