New Jersey is one step closer to updating its eminent domain laws for the first time since the U.S. Supreme Court handed downs its landmark Kelo v. City of New London decision in 2005. On March 4, 2013, the Senate Community and Urban Affairs Committee voted unanimously to approve a bill (S-2447) that would, according to a press release from Senate Democrats, “create a two-track system for redevelopment, establishing separate requirements for redevelopment projects that would involve condemnation and for those that would not.” The two tracks would protect homeowners whose properties might otherwise be subject to condemnation, while also creating a more streamlined process for municipalities undertaking redevelopment projects that do not involve condemnation.

According to the press release:

The legislation would require municipalities to advise property owners within a proposed redevelopment area of the municipality’s intent to use or not use eminent domain to facilitate a redevelopment plan at the outset of the redevelopment study as well as to provide specific notice of such designation. Unless a municipality notifies owners of property located in a proposed redevelopment area that the designation will allow the municipality to take property located in the area by eminent domain – or that the proposed area is a Condemnation Redevelopment Area – the “Local Redevelopment Housing Law” would not authorize the use of eminent domain.

The bill would also authorize municipalities that intend to implement redevelopment initiatives without using eminent domain to do so but to still take advantage of the other tools available under the LRHL that encourage and facilitate economic development activities, create job opportunities, increase commerce, and enhance ratable values within their communities during these difficult economic times. This process would require designating the proposed area as a Non-Condemnation Redevelopment Area.

Having made it out of the Senate Community and Urban Affairs Committee, the bill now heads to the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee. Stay tuned for more updates.