An analysis of data compiled by Bloomberg BNA through the beginning of February showed that the average first-year wage increase for all settlements was 1.7 percent, compared with 2.4 percent reported in the same period in 2013. The median first-year wage increase for settlements reported to date in 2014 was two percent, the same increase as that reported in 2013, and the weighted average was 3.2 percent, compared with .9 percent in 2013. When lump-sum payments were factored into wage calculations, the all-settlements average first-year increase in 2013 was 1.9 percent, compared with 3.1 percent reported in 2013. Median and weighted average increases were two percent and 3.4 percent, respectively, the same increases reported in 2013. The all-settlements (excluding construction and state and local government) average increase was 2.2 percent, compared with 3.6 percent in 2013; the median was 2.7 percent, an increase from 2.2 percent a year ago; and the weighted average was 3.5 percent, compared with last year’s .9 percent.


The American Federation of Teachers ratified new labor contracts at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital on the heels of a strike and lockout at the New London, Connecticuit, hospital late last year. The new contracts, which will run until June 30, 2016, cover approximately 540 registered nurses, and 250 licensed practical nurses and health care technicians and technologists. The central issue in the dispute over the new deal involved language related to job transfers. Though no details on the deal were released, both sides claimed satisfaction with the outcome. 


The International Association of Machinists District 142 reached a five-year deal with Alaska Airlines that covers some 2,800 clerical, office and passenger service employees. The new deal is retroactive to January 1, 2014 and gives the employees a 12.3 percent wage increase over the five-year term. Terms also involved improved job security, better premium pay, and strengthened merger protections. If ratified, the deal would end 10 months of bargaining between the two sides. 


A&T Inc. and the CWA struck a tentative four-year collective bargaining agreement covering approximately 13,000 employees who work in customer service, network organizations, and sales in nine Southeastern states. The new deal provides a $1,050 ratification bonus to employees and would retroactively increase wages by a total of 9.75 percent over the four year term. Additionally, the agreement creates a new pension tier for workers, increases severance pay, upgrades certain jobs and reduces the number of steps in the wage table. The union bargaining committee unanimously recommended that its members ratify the contract. 


As part of the negotiations between the International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA) Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association in Baltimore (which represents Baltimore Port employers), the ILA Local’s 1,200 members rejected a proposed deal by Baltimore’s port management by a vote of 416-140. Union leadership encouraged members to reject the offer because it did not include certain “mandatory subjects of bargaining.” The union told members they should leverage a $3.8 million damages award that had been previously assessed by an arbitrator against ILA Local 333 for a prior work stoppage. That decision stemmed from a three-day strike that shut down the port’s terminals and was found to be in violation of a “no strike” provision of a separate master contract related to container ship cargo on the East Coast. The union had been looking to appeal the ruling and avoid paying penalties, but stated it might use possible payment of the award as incentive to strike a better bargain for its workers. 


As part of the negotiations between the International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA) Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association in Baltimore (which represents Baltimore Port employers), the ILA Local’s 1,200 members rejected a proposed deal by Baltimore’s port management by a vote of 416-140. Union leadership encouraged members to reject the offer because it did not include certain “mandatory subjects of bargaining.” The union told members they should leverage a $3.8 million damages award that had been previously assessed by an arbitrator against ILA Local 333 for a prior work stoppage. That decision stemmed from a three-day strike that shut down the port’s terminals and was found to be in violation of a “no strike” provision of a separate master contract related to container ship cargo on the East Coast. The union had been looking to appeal the ruling and avoid paying penalties, but stated it might use possible payment of the award as incentive to strike a better bargain for its workers. 


After almost seven years of bargaining, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT or Teamsters) reached a tentative four-year agreement with Republic Airways Holdings Inc. covering about 2,200 pilots over three regional airlines: Chautauqua Airlines, Republic Airlines, and Shuttle America. If ratified, the agreement would increase wages, include signing bonuses, and implement improvements to work rules and flexible scheduling. Negotiations had been ongoing since October 2007, and aided by the National Mediation Board since 2011. 


A four-year agreement was ratified between the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood and the Connecticut State Employees Association/Service Employees International Union Local 2011 (CSEA/SEIU). The agreement is the first contract between the parties, and covers about 4,100, state funded, licensed and unlicensed child care service providers in the state’s Care4Kids program. The new agreement provides the first wage increases for employees in 12 years (three percent a year for four years) and changes the state department administration of the child care program from the Department of Social Services to the Office of Early Childhood. The agreement also emphasizes professional development, mandatory orientation for providers, and a way for providers to become licensed. 


Members of the International Association of Machinists District 837 voted 1,269 to 449 to approve a new labor contract with Boeing Co. and a 90-month contract extension. The new agreement, covering about 2,400 employees, extends until 2022 and includes: a signing bonus of $8,000; lump-sum payments of varying amounts in 2017, 2019 and 2021; and wage raises. However, the new deal also sets the defined-benefit pension plan to expire in 2016. The union’s negotiating committee felt that approval of the contract was required to help Boeing attract new military and commercial business.


Dealers belonging to the Transport Workers Union Local 721 in Las Vegas, Nevada voted 342-27 to ratify first contracts with Caesars Entertainment Corporation, which owns Bally’s Las Vegas Hotel and Casino, Paris Las Vegas Hotel and Casino, and Harrah’s Las Vegas. Covering 1,300 table games dealers, the five-year contracts provide 29 days of leave with pay and tips, grievance and arbitration procedures, seniority, layoff and recall procedures, and healthcare plans equivalent to those that upper management has, but with low premium payments by employees. The union claims the new contracts will set the industry standard in Las Vegas.