The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled on June 19, 2014 that the Wartime Suspension of Limitations Act (WSLA) does not apply to the FCA. As a result, the court dismissed Floyd Landis’s non-intervened qui tam claims against his former cycling teammate, Lance Armstrong.

As we have discussed previously on the blog, Lance Armstrong is the defendant in a False Claims Act qui tam case brought by Landis alleging that Armstrong and others defrauded the United States Postal Service of approximately $42 million in sponsorship fees between 1995 and 2004 as a result of Armstrong’s use of performance enhancing drugs and practices. Landis filed suit in 2010 and the Government intervened in part back in February 2013. Landis has continued to press forward with those claims on which the Government has not intervened.

In its order on the defendants’ motion to dismiss, the District Court ruled that Landis’s claims are largely time-barred. Principally, the court held that the tolling provision of the FCA does not apply to Landis. Section 3731(b)(2) of the FCA provides that government has up to three years to bring claims after it knows or has reason to know that a violation of the FCA has occurred, even if this extends beyond the law’s six year statute of limitations (up to a maximum of ten years). Despite his arguments to the contrary, Landis, as a whistleblower and not a government official, is not covered by the provision. All but approximately $68,000 of Landis’s claims are therefore time-barred by the law’s six year statute of limitations, and were accordingly dismissed with prejudice.

In analyzing the statute of limitations arguments, the court addressed the applicability of the WSLA to Landis’s claims. The WSLA, in brief, suspends statutes of limitations for offenses involving fraud against the government during wartime. In recent years, the government often has relied on the law to stop the clock from running, arguing that while the U.S. is still at war in Iraq and Afghanistan, it has nearly unlimited time to bring fraud claims. According to a Wall Street Journal article last year, U.S. Uses Wartime Law to Push Cases Into Overtime (April 15, 2013), the government relied on the WSLA twelve times between 2008 and 2012. That is equal to the number of times the government used the law in the preceding 47 years.

Until this month, the wartime law has been invoked with almost complete success in FCA cases. The Landis court, however, found that the WSLA does not apply to the FCA. According to the court, the WSLA only suspends statutes of limitation when the offense at issue requires proof of specific intent to defraud the government. The FCA does not and has not since its amendment in 1986. Therefore, the court found that Landis cannot rely on the WSLA to bring his otherwise stale claims. While other courts have previously limited the reach of the WSLA (e.g., to FCA cases in which the government has intervened; to cases regarding war-related contracts), the District Court is the first to completely reject its applicability to the FCA.

The court’s motion to dismiss order in United States ex rel. Floyd Landis v. Tailwind Sports Corporation, et al., No. 10-cv-976 (RLW) can be found here.