An en banc panel of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) in the case of Aqua Products, Inc. v. Matal recently held that in an inter-partes (IPR) proceeding, the burden of persuasion rests with the challenger to persuade the PATB that substitute claims proposed by a patent owner in a motion to amend are unpatentable. This is a significant shift from the Board’s practice that had required the patent owner to demonstrate that proposed substitute claims are patentable over the art cited by the challenger and the art known to the patent owner.

The PTAB has issued guidelines regarding motions to amend in light of the Aqua Products decision. The guidelines indicate that consistent with the Aqua Products decision, the Board will not place the burden of persuasion on the patent owner with regard to the patentability of substitute claims presented in a motion to amend. If the patent owner presents a reasonable number of substitute claims that do not enlarge the scope of the original claims and do not introduce new matter, “the Board will proceed to determine whether the substitute claims are unpatentable by a preponderance of the evidence based on the entirety of the record, including any opposition made by the petitioner.” In particular, “if the entirety of the evidence of record before the Board is in equipoise as to the unpatentability of one or more substitute claims, the Board will grant the motion to amend with respect to such claims, and the Office will issue a certificate incorporating those claims into the patent at issue.”

The guidelines, however, indicate that a motion to amend must still set forth “written description” support and support for the benefit of a filing date in relation to each substitute claim, and respond to grounds of unpatentability involved in the trial.” The guidelines further emphasize that all parties have a duty of candor and in particular the patent owner has a duty “to disclose to the Board information that the patent owner is aware of that is material to the patentability of substitute claims, if such information is not already of record in the case.” The rules regarding the types, timing and page limits of briefs remain unchanged. Further, the patent owner must still confer with the Board before filing a motion to amend.

The recognition that the burden for proving unpatentability rests with the challenger even when the patent owner presents substitute claims can potentially result in more motions to amend to be granted. Nonetheless, a patent owner seeking to amend challenged claims may still consider other venues for presenting such amendments. For example, such a patent owner can present amended claims in an ex-parte reexamination or a reissue proceeding. One advantage of such alternative venues for presenting claims amendments is that, unlike in an IPR proceeding, a third party cannot argue against amendments presented in an ex-parte reexamination or a reissue proceeding initiated by a patent owner.