• The UFCW in the Ohio Valley rejected a collective bargaining proposal by Kroger Co. The principal point of contention is Kroger’s health care proposal. The union members gave union leaders authorization to call a strike if no acceptable contract offer is reached.
  • CBS Corp. employees represented by the IBEW ratified a new 3.5 year contract, expiring Jan. 31, 2015. The contract covers 2,800 technicians in nine cities and provides a 7.5% wage increase. The contract also provides that employees will continue to have jurisdiction over work performed to the same extent they do now if the company should change its method of transmitting signals to be viewed from over the air to another method, such as fiber-optic cable; that a work-sharing agreement will be put in place to allow IBEW workers as well as Directors Guild of America workers to both perform work in connection with new control room automation systems; and that any technician laid off due to the installation and use of a control room automation system will receive double severance upon a release and waiver of recall rights.
  • United Steelworker represented employees at Georgia-Pacific ratified a four-year master economic agreement covering 5,135 workers at 13 paper mill facilities nationwide. The new master economic agreement set national wage and benefit terms for workers while allowing for additional provisions for individual mills to be bargained at the local level. It further increased wages, continued to pay employee health care premiums, provided more dental plan options, and improved pension benefits including a $1 increase in the pension multiplier in the third and fourth years of the contract for employees participating in the benefit plan.
  • Frontier Airlines and the Association of Flight Attendants-Communications Workers of America ratified an agreement that includes pay cuts in exchange for extending ownership stake in the company to roughly 1,000 covered flights attendants. The agreement would save the company about $16 million in labor costs over the four-year term of the deal.
  • National Football League players approved a new 10-year labor contract lasting until the 2020 season and the 2021 draft. Players will get more days off, fewer full-contact practices, enhanced injury protection benefits, a reduction in the offseason program, and additional money for medical research, health care programs and NFL charities. The agreement also includes $900 million for players pensions and makes improvements to the benefits plans of retired players.
  • The Teamsters ratified a national collective bargaining agreement with the National Automobile Transporters Labor Division covering 4,500 truck drivers and other workers in the carhaul industry. The agreement provides for an annual wage increase and 10% cost-of-living adjustment of up to 10 cents per hour per year, if inflation exceeds 3% in any time period. The agreement also provides that employees’ contributions toward health, welfare, and pension benefits will increase. The agreement expires Aug. 31, 2015.
  • The IAM ratified a five-year contract with aircraft manufacturer Hawker Beechcraft Corp. in Kansas covering 2,600 production workers. The contract provides wage and pension increases while raising employee contributions toward health insurance premiums.
  • United Steelworker represented employees at Allegheny Technologies Inc. ratified a four-year contract after rejecting an initial agreement primarily due to retired members concerns about health care premium increases. The new agreement extends retiree medical benefits to new hires, caps monthly insurance premiums, provides a signing bonus, and across-the-board wage increases.
  • The IBEW and Arizona Public Service Co. reached a tentative agreement on a three-year contract. The agreement will provide for an increase in wages, per diem allowances for those working outside their normal geographic work areas, and the amount of paid leave that can be carried from one year to the next.
  • Analysis of contract settlement data compiled by BNA for settlements reached during 2011 shows an average first-year wage increase of 1.4%, down from 1.6% in 2010. The median first-year wage increase for settlements in 2011 was also 1 percent compared to 1.5% in 2010, and the weighted average was 1.1% compared to 1.6% in 2010.