• The Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU) has published position papers on the UK’s stance in the Brexit negotiations on the European atomic energy community (Euratom), the role of the European court of justice (ECJ) and EU organisations and agencies. The position papers can be reviewed here.
  • The Scottish and Welsh First Ministers have voted to block legislative consent for the bill, saying it was a “naked power grab” by Westminster because it did not immediately return powers to the devolved administrations after taking them from the EU (Independent).
  • Theresa May is also facing the threat of a parliamentary defeat over the bill after Labour warned that it would vote against it unless she made significant concessions. With only a few Conservative rebels needed to inflict defeat on the prime minister, the shadow Brexit secretary, Keir Starmer, told the Guardian he was “putting the government on notice” and demanded changes on matters from parliamentary scrutiny to workers’ rights. (Guardian)
  • The Prime Minister has also been accused of trying to snatch sweeping new powers that would allow her to scrap people’s rights after Brexit without telling Parliament. The measures proposed in the bill go even further than the “Henry the VIII powers”, which already weakened scrutiny. Campaigners warned the bill was “ripe for abuse”, would lead to a bonfire of rights and protections and that the Government was “cutting Parliament out”. (Independent)
  • Britain has for the first time explicitly acknowledged it has financial obligations to the EU after Brexit, a move that is likely to avert a full-scale clash over the exit bill in talks next week. In a written statement to parliament touching on a “financial settlement”, the government recognised on Thursday “that the UK has obligations to the EU . . . that will survive the UK’s withdrawal — and that these need to be resolved”. The text, released by Joyce Anelay, a Brexit minister, was immediately seen by Brussels as a potentially important development. EU diplomats say the wording “goes further” than Theresa May’s previous reference to Britain being willing to reach a “fair settlement” of unspecified obligations. (FT)