The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office extends the deadline for applications under its Patents for Humanity Program, “which recognizes patent holders who use their technology for humanitarian purposes.” The new deadline is October 31, 2014.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark office expands its cooperation in classification activities with the Korean Intellectual Property Office (KIPO). In an agreement signed during a bilateral meeting in Geneva, the agencies hope to “improve the patent granting process through streamlined access to patent documentation.” KIPO will expand the number of documents included in the Cooperative Patent Classification system by fully classifying its patent applications and utility models.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requests nominations for candidates to serve on the Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Infectious Diseases. Nominees, who may be invited to serve terms of up to four years, should have expertise in such fields as “infectious diseases and related disciplines, including epidemiology, microbiology, bacteriology, virology, pathogen genomics, bioinformatics, clinical medicine, and veterinary medicine.” This board advises a number of national health centers and agencies on strategies, goals and priorities for the programs and research within their ambit. The nomination deadline is October 24, 2014.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reopens the comment period on draft guidance titled “Internet/Social Media Platforms with Character Space Limitations: Presenting Risk and Benefit Information for Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices” at the request of certain commenters for more time. The new deadline is October 29, 2014. “The draft guidance describes FDA’s current thinking on how manufacturers, packers, and distributors of prescription human and animal drugs and medical devices for human use, including biological products, that choose to present benefit information should present both benefit and risk information within advertising and promotional labeling of their FDA-regulated medical products on electronic/digital platforms that are associated with character space limitations, specifically on the Internet and through social media or other technological venues.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reopens the comment period on draft guidance titled “Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation About Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices” at the request of certain commenters for more time. The new deadline is October 29, 2014. “The draft guidance describes FDA’s current thinking on how manufacturers, packers, and distributors of human and animal drugs and medical devices for human use, including biological products, should respond, if they choose to respond, to misinformation related to a firm’s own FDA-approved or cleared products when that information is created or disseminated by independent third parties.”

The Office of Management and Budget approves the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) proposed eye-tracking study of directto- consumer (DTC ) prescription drug advertisements. With current regulations requiring that information about a product’s major risks be included in the audio portion of DTC TV ads, FDA has proposed including this risk information in superimposed text as well, hypothesizing that other audio and visuals during the audio major risk statement may be distracting and decrease risk recall.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration seeks comments on its exploration of the use of statutory changes to “modify the current requirement that the use of multiple new animal drugs in a combination drug medicated feed be the subject of an approved new animal drug application (NADA). The Agency is also inviting comment on potential changes to procedures and requirements related to the NADA approval process for such products that can be accomplished under the Agency’s existing statutory authority.” The comment deadline is September 9, 2015.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requests comments on its exploration of the use of statutory changes to “expand the use of conditional