On May 13, a district court in the Eastern District of Virginia dismissed a healthcare fraud action under the Virginia Fraud Against Taxpayers Act (“VFATA”) against Laboratory Corporation of America (“LabCorp”) alleging that LabCorp routinely charged Medicaid more than its “usual and customary charge” for laboratory services. The district court held that the relators’ allegations about Medicaid overcharges and improper kickbacks for Medicaid referrals could not proceed because relators (i) failed to specify the particulars of a single false claim under Rule 9(b), and (ii) failed to articulate any particular certification defendants made that was false, in violation of Rule 8(a).

The relators—competitors of LabCorp—alleged that each of LabCorp’s Medicaid reimbursement claims was actionably “false” in two ways. First, LabCorp’s charges to Medicaid prices for laboratory services were higher than the lower prices that LabCorp routinely negotiated with individual insurers and physicians, which relators alleged violated Virginia regulations requiring LabCorp to charge Medicaid its “usual and customary” rates. Second, relators alleged that these lower charges offered to individual physicians constituted impermissible kickbacks meant to induce referral of Medicaid business. Relators alleged that these violations had rendered 2,730,814 claims submitted by LabCorp “false.”

With regard to Rule 9(b), the court acknowledged a split between the circuits about whether relators must identify all of the particulars—e.g., the who, what, when, where, how—of at least one representative claim, and noted that the Fourth Circuit had not addressed that issue. Nonetheless, relying heavily on the Fourth Circuit’s decision in U.S. ex rel. Nathan v. Takeda Pharm. N. Am., 707 F.3d 451, 456 (4th Cir. 2013), cert. denied, 134 S. Ct. 1759 (2014) (a decision we previously wrote about here), the court held that relators must allege with particularity the submission of at least one specific claim for payment. The court found that the relators failed to do so.

On an alternative but related ground, the court also dismissed the complaint under Rule 8(a), relying heavily on the difference between certifying legal compliance in order to participate in a program versus to be paid under that program. The court, distinguishing between legal and factual falsity, held that, in this complaint alleging factual falsity, no liability for fraud under a false certification theory can exist unless relators plead the details of what statement defendants made that was actually false. In Hunter, the relators argued that LabCorp could not have participated in the Medicaid program without agreeing to be bound by Virginia regulations, which mandate that providers cannot charge higher prices for Medicaid patients than for non-Medicaid patients. Under this theory, each overpriced claim was made false because LabCorp would not have been able to submit those overpriced claims were it not for its prior agreement to abide by the regulations. The court, however, held that LabCorp’s general agreement to abide by the law in exchange for participating in Medicaid was not an agreement in exchange for Medicaid payment; its agreement was not false when it was made; and, most notably, “a general representation of compliance with all laws lacks the requisite nexus between the subject matter of the certification and the event triggering the loss—i.e., the kickback and overcharge schemes.”

Although this case arose under the VFATA, rather than the federal False Claims Act, the court’s grounding of its opinion in Rules 8(a) and 9(b) offers guidance to companies seeking to defend against similarly allegations of fraud in the Fourth Circuit. This ruling further strengthens the Fourth Circuit’s already stringent pleading standards under Rules 8(a) and 9(b).