• On April 9, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) along with Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-CA), Rep. Judy Chu (D-CA), Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-NY), Rep. Mike Doyle (D-PA), and Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) introduced H.R. 1424, the Security in Energy and Manufacturing (SEAM) Act of 2013. The bill would provide a 30% tax credit or grant to renewable energy manufacturing companies building, expanding, or retrofitting facilities.
  • On April 10, Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) reintroduced S. 696, the Safe Chemicals Act, with 28 other Democratic and Independent Senators. The bill would reform the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) by granting the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to require additional testing for potential toxic chemicals as well as the authority to issue warning labels and prohibit production.
  • The same day, Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) and 12 other Representatives introduced H.R. 1461, the RFS Elimination Act. The bipartisan bill would repeal the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and requires renewable fuels to participate in the open market.
  • The same day, Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) and 21 other Representatives introduced H.R. 1462, the RFS Reform Act. The bipartisan bill would amend the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) to cap gasoline blends at 10 percent ethanol (E10), to remove the ethanol requirements, and to require the setting of cellulosic biofuels production levels.
  • The same day, Rep. Chris Gibson (R-NY) and Rep. Mike Thompson (D-NY) introduced H.R. 1465, a bill that would create a tax credit for energy storage properties that are connected to the electric grid.
  • The same day, Rep. Mike Burgess (R-TX) reintroduced H.R. 1469, the Leave Ethanol Volumes at Existing Levels (LEVEL) Act. The bill would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from issuing any more waivers for vehicles to use gasoline blended with ethanol, keeping the blends where they are.
  • The same day, Rep. Steve Womack (R-AR) along with Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA), Rep. Rick Crawford (R-AR), and Rep. Tim Griffin (R-AR) introduced H.R. 1482, a bill that would amend the Clean Air Act’s renewable fuel program and remove certain requirements.
  • On April 11, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) and Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) introduced S. 717, a bill that would require the Secretary of Energy to create a grant pilot program for nonprofits to retrofit buildings.
  • The same day, Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) introduced the Sunshine for Regulatory Decrees and Settlements Act, S. 714 and H.R. 1493 respectively. The bill would prohibit the “sue-and-settle” approach for passing federal agency regulations where parties sue agencies for failing to meet a certain requirement. Affected parties would have to participate in settlement negotiations, and the settlement would have to undergo a period of public comment. The Senate bill had 7 Republican cosponsors, and the House bill had 24 Republican cosponsors.
  • The same day, Rep. Nick Rahall (D-WV) introduced H.R. 1486, a bill that would prevent the creation and implementation of a carbon tax by the Treasury Secretary and by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator.
  • On the same day, Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) introduced H.R. 1493, the Sunshine for Regulatory Decrees and Settlements Act. The bill seeks to curb an agency’s ability to settlements until the parties affected by the proposed regulation are allowed to participate in the settlement negotiations.
  • On April 12, Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA) along with 16 cosponsors introduced H.R. 1524, a bipartisan bill to amend the Buy American Act so as to require “green” technologies purchased by federal agencies or by states with federal funds and in property eligible for the renewable energy production or investment tax credits to have 85 percent domestic content.