“It was no part of my recommendations that parties should refrain from agreeing reasonable extensions of time, which neither imperil hearing dates nor otherwise disrupt the proceedings” said Jackson L.J. in Hallam Estates Limited v Teresa Baker [2014] EWCA Civ 661.

In Hallam the claimants (paying parties) asked for an extension of time for filing their points of dispute in proceedings for detailed assessment of costs. The defendant had been late in filing her bill of costs. Jackson L.J. held that they had given sensible reasons for asking for the extension and, given her own delay, the defendant could hardly object to a modest extension. Pursuant to r. 3.8(3) the court’s approval was required for such an extension but this should have been no more than a formality. In fact the judge approved it on paper without a hearing and this approach was endorsed by the Court of Appeal.

Rule 3.8 is about to be amended to allow parties to agree extensions of time for up to 28 days as long as no hearing dates are imperilled. The parties have a duty to further the overriding objective (which includes allotting an appropriate share of the court’s resources to cases) and thus, according to the great man himself, agreeing reasonable extensions which don’t imperil dates or disrupt the course of litigation is not a breach of a legal representative’s duty to their client.

Jackson L.J. made it clear that if an application was made for an extension of time before the expiry of the time permitted by a rule or practice direction the application remained an application for an extension of time even if time expired before the application was heard. He said that the principles governing relief from sanctions were not applicable in these circumstances.

As was said in Mitchell itself, it is clearly better to make an application for an extension in advance if a deadline is likely not to be kept. Greater clarity has now been brought to the extent to which parties can agree extensions of time. A number of cases have now emphasised the need to identify whether a court sanction has actually been imposed by breach of a court order, rule or practice direction – not all breaches automatically result in a sanction and therefore it is doubtful that relief from sanctions is required in such circumstances.