• For the second time in six months, fast food industry workers in New York City walked out on their restaurant employers as part of a campaign to raise wages and establish union rights. Drawing some 400 workers, double the participation rate of the first November 2012 walkout, organizers claimed the April action affected 60 New York fast food locations. The walkout is part of the “Fast Food Forward” campaign organized by the SEIU and three other community organizations. Affected fast food franchises included McDonald’s, Burger King, Papa John’s, Wendy’s, Domino’s, KFC, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut, which collectively employ approximately 50,000 people in New York City.
  • Similar to the New York Fast Food Forward Campaign, hundreds of Chicago-area low-wage food service and retail workers walked off their jobs as part of a one-day strike dubbed the “Fight for 15” campaign, demanding a $15 per hour base wage and authority to form unions without employer interference. The Chicago campaign coordinated a targeted walkout from multiple national employers’ local franchises, including: McDonald’s, Dunkin’ Donuts, Subway, Sears, Macy’s, T.J. Maxx, and Victoria’s Secret. The Workers Organizing Committee of Chicago (“WOCC”) organized the strike with assistance from the SEIU and the Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America. According to the WOCC, there are 275,000 low-wage workers in Chicago with food service workers earning an average of $8.35 per hour and $10 per hour for retail workers, slightly higher than the Illinois state minimum wage.
  • Teamsters Local Union 377 sanitation landfill workers at Republic Services/Allied Waste’s Carbon Limestone (“Republic”) landfill in Youngstown, Ohio extended a picket line to Republic’s Anaheim, California facilities. More than 400 Teamsters at Republic’s transfer station, commercial and residential truck yard, and materials recovery facility have refused to cross picket lines. The Youngstown workers initially went on strike in response to alleged unfair labor practices by Republic. The Anaheim workers joined other Republic workers, who have also refused to cross picket lines, at five other California facilities, as well as job sites in Indiana and Illinois. Over the past year, forced lockouts and strikes by Republic employees have disrupted trash collection for hundreds of thousands of residents across the country.
  • Nurses at the Quincy Medical Center went on a 24-hour strike, marking the first nurses’ strike at a greater Boston area hospital in 25 years. The nurses walked out in protest of alleged dangerously low staffing levels and following the breakdown of negotiations between the Massachusetts Nurses Association and Steward Health Care, the hospital’s owner. The strike arose following the hospital’s switch from non-profit to for-profit status. Also cited as a reason for the strike was the hospital’s closing of a 40-bed unit due to financial losses in 2012 and expected losses in 2013.