On May 9, the DOJ issued a new policy to discourage “piling on” in corporate enforcement cases, including those involving the FCPA. The new policy directs the DOJ to “consider the totality of fines and penalties” being imposed by the DOJ and other law enforcement agencies on a company for the same misconduct. In a speech delivered to a New York City bar organization, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein described the new policy as encouraging “coordination among Department components and other enforcement agencies” with the aim of “avoiding unfair duplicative penalties.”

The new policy contains four main elements. First, the DOJ should not threaten criminal prosecution solely to persuade a company to pay a larger settlement in a civil case. Second, DOJ components must coordinate with one another to achieve an overall equitable result. Third, the DOJ should coordinate with other federal, state, local, and foreign enforcement authorities. Finally, the DOJ should consider several factors, including the egregiousness of the wrongdoing and the adequacy of the company’s cooperation with the DOJ, in determining whether multiple penalties serve the interests of justice in a particular case.

Rosenstein specifically noted in his address that the DOJ’s “FCPA Unit [had recently] announced its first coordinated resolution with . . . Singapore.” See FCPA Scorecard post. The new policy does not prohibit the DOJ from considering additional remedies in “appropriate circumstances.”