Following cases in Italy, the UK and before the European Commission, the Danish authorities have reached an abuse of dominance finding against CD Pharma (CDP).

CDP was found to have imposed price increases of up to 2,000% on supplies of Syntocinon, without any justification in terms of increased costs. The product, used in connection with childbirth, is long off patent.

Two points mark this case out from other excessive pricing investigations.

First, this is as much a cautionary tale about exclusive licensing as it is about excessive pricing. In acquiring an exclusive licence to what appears to be a ‘must stock’ product for hospitals CDP acquired a dominant position, leading to the risk of abuse.

While exclusive licensing between non-competitors generally does not raise competition concerns, it is notable that Commission guidance refers specifically to the justification for exclusive licensing as the bringing of a new product to market. In the case of an old product which does not require further development, the basic justification for the exclusivity appears to be missing. In this case, if competitor Orifarm had been able to approach the manufacturer of Syntocinon rather than having to purchase from CDP as the local distributor, there would have been a greater chance of price competition on the Danish market.

Second, the Danish authority is alive to the wider (umbrella) harm caused by the pricing strategy which extend beyond the period of direct infringement. The press release refers to the risk of permanent price increases - in particular where products are procured through periodic tender processes. This could be a significant point in any attempt by the Danish authorities to seek damages in respect of the abuse.