After the referendum on 23 June 2016, whereby the people of Britain voted to leave the European Union, it has finally been announced that Mrs. Theresa May will formally notify Mr. Donald Tusk, the EU Council President, on Wednesday 29 March 2017, by way of a letter, that Britain are going to trigger Article 50.

Within 48 hours of receiving the letter, the EU Council will need to respond with the guidelines for negotiation.

What does this mean for the UK?

Once this is triggered, Britain has two years to negotiate terms with each of the 27 member states and the clock starts ticking towards Britain leaving the EU, which means Britain should leave the EU by April 2019. However, there is speculation that negotiations may take longer than two years. This time scale can only be extended by consent of the European Council and this must be a unanimous decision of every other member state government.

Each member state will lay down their terms and Britain will in turn negotiate and set out their terms, a spokesman for Mrs. May stated she will concentrate on “delivering the will of the British people”.

David Davis, the Secretary of State for exiting the EU, stated:

“The Government is clear in its aims: a deal that works for every nation and region of the UK and indeed for all of Europe – a new, positive partnership between the UK and our friends and allies in the European Union.”

The most difficult part of negotiations will be new relationships and rules which will apply, especially in terms of free movement.

Whilst we hope this will be a beneficial outlook for Britain, we wait and watch to see exactly what the terms of negotiation will be. We will continue to keep you updated.