• Workers’ Voice, the AFL-CIO’s Super PAC, initiated a web-based tool entitled “RePurpose” that allows individuals to earn points by volunteering for certain activities like phone banking and canvassing. The points can then be redeemed to direct a political activity, such as advertisements, in support of a labor-approved candidate, chosen by the volunteer. The Super PAC has another tool called “Friends and Neighbors” which allows individuals to phone bank their friends and acquaintances for candidates, use social media platforms to contact registered voters and send direct mail.
  • Rep. John Kline, R-Minn, the chairman of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, asked Attorney General Eric Holder to initiate a Department of Justice investigation into allegations that the NLRB’s acting General Counsel, Lafe Solomon, improperly took part in a case involving Wal-Mart Stores Inc. while holding stock in the company. The NLRB Inspector General, David P. Berry, issued a report finding that Solomon violated ethics rules when he took part in the case. At the time, Solomon owned stock in Wal-Mart that was worth more than $18,000. Despite finding the ethics violation, the report concluded that there was no evidence that Solomon acted for his own financial gain.
  • The Office of Inspector General of the Department of Labor (“OIG”) issued a report critical of the effectiveness of audits performed by the Labor Department’s Office of Labor Management Standards. The audits determine whether unions are complying with the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (“LMRDA”). The OIG found that the audits focused on potential criminal violations but failed to identify other non-criminal violations, such as failure to file or maintain records that violate the LMRDA. Additionally, the OIG found that the audits could not identify the most egregious union violators of the LMRDA and could not ensure that the unions corrected any violations. The Office of Labor Management Standards responded, disagreeing that the measure of compliance should include non-criminal violations, and stating that it was not cost effective to determine whether unions have corrected their recordkeeping violations.