In Geonie v. O.D. & P. N.Y., Ltd., a worker who injured himself by stepping into an opening left by the removal of a tile from a raised floor on the construction site sued the general contractor for negligence. Although the danger of removed tiles was generally discussed at the general contractor’s weekly safety meetings with their subcontractors, the New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, held that there was no evidence that the general contractor had actual notice of the specific unsafe condition. In other words, the fact that the issue was discussed in weekly safety meetings did not put the general contractor on constructive notice of the actual removed tile which caused the worker’s injury. Finding no other evidence that the general contractor had notice of the unsafe condition, the Court dismissed the worker’s negligence claim. As a result, general contractors are not disadvantaged by holding regular safety meetings with subcontractors and workers. Rather, regular safety meetings may help to demonstrate a general contractor’s satisfactory supervision and control over the worksite, and will not automatically put the general contractor on constructive notice of specific instances of dangerous conditions. 50 A.D.3d 444, 855 N.Y.S.2d 495 (N.Y. App. Div. 2008).