Mexico’s Supreme Court Justices Salvador Aguirre Anguiano and Guillermo Ortiz Mayagoitia will conclude their terms by then end of this month. 

President Felipe Calderon has nominated, as replacements, the following candidates:

  • Vicente Monroy Gómez;
  • Alberto Pérez Dayán;
  • Andrea Zambrana Castañeda;
  • Manuel Baraibar Constantino;
  • Emma Meza Fonseca; and
  • María Temblador Vidrio.

The nominations are interesting, as there is no consistency in the nominees’ ideology. Also interesting is the fact that the justices will be elected just before the incoming President, Enrique Peña Nieto, takes office.

Justices of the Mexican Supreme Court serve for fifteen years and are not eligible to serve a second term. The justices elect one of them to serve as President of the Court.  Presidents serve a four-year period.

Pursuant to article 76 of Mexico's Constitution, new justices shall be appointed by the Senate. The Constitution requires the nominees to: (a) be Mexican by birth; (b) be at least 35 years old; (c) be licensed to practice law for at least 10 years; (d) be of good moral character and have no criminal record; (e) reside in Mexico for at least two years prior to the election; (f) not to serve as governor, senator, representative or state attorney the year before the election.