On August 8, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California issued a widely anticipated decision in O Bannon v. NCAA, striking down the NCAA s rules prohibiting student athletes from receiving compensation for the use of their names, images and likenesses during their college athletic careers. After a highly publicized, multi-week bench trial, the court agreed with the plaintiffs, led by former UCLA basketball star Ed O Bannon, that the NCAA s rules violated the Sherman Act. The court entered a permanent injunction providing that member schools may not enter into any agreement to cap student athletes compensation for the licensing and use of players names, images and likenesses at less than each student athletes full cost of attendance at a member school. The courts injunction also provided that member schools may pay their student athletes deferred compensation for the licensing and use of players names, images and likenesses (such deferred compensation being placed in trust), but that member schools may not agree to cap such deferred compensation at less than $5,000 (in 2014 dollars) per player per year.