• On August 31, 2010, the FCC will be releasing the executive summary of the National Broadband Plan translated to Chinese (Simplified), Samoan, Tagalog, Korean, Thai, and Vietnamese at a forum in Los Angeles on Broadband and the Asian American and Pacific Islander Communities being held at the Japanese American National Museum.
  • FCC Commissioners Michael J. Copps and Mignon Clyburn both spoke at a public hearing titled “The Future of the Internet” in Minneapolis on August 19, 2010. Commissioner Copps discussed his view that Internet service providers are saying “don’t worry,” but that they have an incentive to control the content and distribution of broadband. Copps advocated “calling an apple an apple” and classifying broadband as a telecommunications service, and said the Verizon-Google proposal excludes wireless broadband from future Internet openness and creates a tiered Internet. Commissioner Clyburn echoed Commissioner Copps’ concerns about treating wireless broadband differently, and noted that an FCC study found that a greater percentage of African Americans and Latinos access the Internet only through their wireless handsets. Commissioner Copps’ speech is available here. Commissioner Clyburn’s speech is available here.
  • Tom Tauke, Verizon’s Executive Vice President-Public Affairs, Policy, and Communications, defended the Verizon-Google Open Internet proposal at the Technology Policy Institute’s Aspen Forum on August 23, 2010. Tauke claimed that the proposal would fulfill “the President’s campaign promise of non-discrimination and transparency on the Internet.” He also claimed that wireless carriers are innocent when it came to blocking wireless applications; the application developers and operating system allegedly were blocking applications.
  • FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski spoke at the Broadband Summit at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management on August 24, 2010. The Chairman continued to support Open Internet principles, stating that the Internet’s open architecture spurred investment and innovation in its development. He stated that users, and not service providers, should control content and services on the Internet.