The Christmas period is marketed as a jubilant and joyful time surrounded by loved ones and, for many, it has been. However, the combination of social and financial stresses that the festive period brings often intensifies feelings of discontent. This, coupled with the start of a New Year encouraging change and new beginnings, can together act as a catalyst to prompt the beginning of a looming separation.

Many couples who have been considering separation for some time wait until after Christmas and the New Year before initiating divorce, often putting on a brave face to protect family, children and friends. Now with the festivities over, this Christmas delay leads to a rush of enquiries regarding divorce on the first working Monday of January, dubbed ‘Divorce Day’. This year Divorce Day will fall on Monday 8 January 2018.

According to a recent poll of 2,000 spouses, one in five married couples are considering separation from their partners after staying together over the festive period, signifying that no one should feel alone when dealing with the current prospect of divorce. The Office for National Statistics reports that 42 percent of all marriages end in divorce and it is expected that over 40,500 people in the UK are expected to search online for divorce throughout January, with much of this falling on and around 8 January.