The aftermath of the Orlando nightclub tragedy has led to much discussion about ways that healthcare providers can and should deal with compliance with health information privacy requirements in the face of disasters that injure or sicken many individuals in a limited time frame. One aspect is the pressure to treat patients while simultaneously fulfilling the need to supply current and relevant information to family, friends and the media about patient status without breaching HIPAA by improperly disclosing protected health information (PHI).

Our partner Elizabeth Litten has already posted a prior blog entry on some HIPAA issues that surfaced in the Orlando disaster. She and I were recently featured again by our good friend Marla Durben Hirsch in her article in the August, 2016 issue of Medical Practice Compliance Alert entitled “After Orlando: Keep family, friends informed without violating HIPAA.” Full text can be found in the August, 2016 issue, but a synopsis is below.

Some of the tips provided by Litten and Kline in the article include the following:

  1. Kline: Review and update your practice’s disaster/emergency plan. “[Orlando] was such a disaster, and [there was an appearance created that] the hospital didn’t approach it with calmness and a professional approach.”
  2. Litten: One of the easily forgotten parts of HIPAA is that a covered entity can exercise professional discretion. “It’s best if the patient can agree [to the disclosure]. But if the patient can’t give consent, the provider has ways to provide information and exercise that discretion.” Kline added, “So there’s no need for a HIPAA waiver; the rule anticipates such situations.”
  3. Litten: Make sure that the practice’s designated spokesperson is knowledgeable about HIPAA. “This includes what can and can’t be divulged to friends, family members and the media.
  4. Litten: Educate clinicians on professional discretion. “Remember when disclosing information to view it through the eyes of the patient. If you reasonably believe that a patient would want the information communicated, it’s OK. The professional is acting as proxy for a patient who can’t speak.”
  5. Kline: Share contact information so staff can quickly get guidance from the practice’s compliance officer, especially during emergency situations. “For instance, a clinician being bombarded in the emergency department may have a question regarding whether she can tell a patient’s relative that the patient has been treated and released (she can).”
  6. Kline: Add this information to your practice’s HIPAA compliance program. “If you have policies and procedures on this, document that training occurred, and [if it] can show you attempted to comply with HIPAA, a court would be very hard pressed to find liability if a patient later claims invasion of privacy.”
  7. Kline: Don’t discriminate. “So clinicians exercising their professional discretion in informing friends and family members need to be gender neutral and objective.”
  8. Kline and Litten: Train administrative staff about HIPAA. “Not only should medical staff know the rules, but so should other staff members such as front desk staff, managers and billing personnel. It’s pretty bad when the head of a hospital is so uninformed about HIPAA that he provides misinformation to the mayor.”
  9. Kline and Litten: Highlight the limitations of the disclosure. “You can’t go overboard and reveal more than is allowed. For instance, a provider can tell a friend or family member about an incapacitated patient’s location, general condition or death. But that doesn’t mean that he can divulge that the lab tests indicate the patient has hepatitis. HIPAA also requires that a disclosure be made only of information that’s ‘minimally necessary.'”

Planning ahead by healthcare providers can help them comply with HIPAA if a disaster situation occurs to keep family and friends informed as to patient status, while contemporaneously carrying out their most important tasks: saving lives, alleviating pain and providing quality care to victims. This approach, however, combined with a good helping of common sense and professionalism, is not confined to disasters – it should be the practice of providers for non-emergent situations as well.