In the media

‘Stay classy’ AMA: Guild Pharmacist-issued absence from work certificates are continuing to raise the ire of medical practitioners, with the Australian Medical Association (AMA) again criticising their use (22 March 2019). More...

Consultations on adoption of European Union guidelines in Australia Consultation on proposed adoption of European Union guidelines. Closing date: 29 April 2019 (18 March 2019). More...

Cases

Health Ombudsman v Wood [2019] QCAT 35PROFESSIONS AND TRADES – HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS – ENROLLED NURSE – DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS – SANCTION - where the practitioner was an enrolled nurse – where the practitioner admitted a boundary violation with respect to his relationship with an adult patient under his care – where the respondent admitted engaging in professional misconduct – where the respondent declined to provide written submissions on sanction – whether the sanction proposed by the applicant is appropriate PROFESSIONS AND TRADE – HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS – ENROLLED NURSE – DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS – PRACTITIONER’S KNOWLEDGE OF OBLIGATIONS REGARDING PROFESSIONAL BOUNDARIES - where the applicant and the respondent submitted separately and in the Statement of Agreed and Disputed Facts that the respondent was not aware of his obligations with respect to maintaining appropriate boundaries with patients – where the respondent was an enrolled nurse with over 30 years’ experience - where the respondent admitted the boundary violation – whether the respondent knew of his obligations regarding professional boundaries PROFESSIONS AND TRADE – HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS – DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS – EFFECT OF BOUNDARY VIOLATION ON PATIENT – where the applicant submits that the patient suffered actual harm as a result of the boundary violation – where the respondent denies that the patient suffered actual harm as a result of the boundary violation – where the patient provided a statement in support of the respondent – where the applicant put expert opinion before the Tribunal as to the likely effect of the respondent’s conduct on a patient in similar circumstances to the subject patient – whether the patient suffered actual harm