The Copyright Clearance Center’s (CCC) Velocity of Content blog is offering three articles adapted from my recent CCC-sponsored webinar presentation about uses of music within the work and office environment:

Music Licensing: The Difference Between Public Performance and Synchronization Licenses The complexity of music licensing stems in part from the different types and names of music licenses. The music industry gives different names to music licenses according to whether you are using the song or the sound recording and according to how you are using the music. During the webinar, I reviewed different categories of music licenses and gave examples of when you might need each one – including public performance licenses which grant permission to perform music in public and synchronization (or synch) licenses which grant permission for the use of a song in a video, advertisement, or other audio-visual presentation. Read the article, “Music Licensing: The Difference Between Public Performance and Synchronization Licenses” on CCC’s Velocity of Content blog.

Using Music at Work – 5 Source and Licensing Considerations During the webinar, I discussed the pros and cons of the following sources where a company might seek music for its video, advertisement, and training materials:

  • Existing Popular Music (i.e., music that has charted)
  • Production Music
  • Independent Artist Music
  • Creative Commons Music
  • Commissioning Original Music
  • Other Online Sources

Read the article, “Using Music at Work – 5 Source and Licensing Considerations” on CCC’s Velocity of Content blog.

Music Licensing: What is Considered Fair Use? Copyright fair use is an exception to copyright protection that allows you to use a small portion of a copyrighted work without the copyright owner’s permission. The challenge for those who want to rely on fair use if that the doctrine is subjective, has no bright line rules, and must be decided on a case-by-case basis according to the specific circumstances. During the webinar, I discussed how the fair use doctrine applies to educational use, incidental use (i.e., a documentary production picking up music in the background during a shoot), and use for news reporting purposes. Read the article, “Music Licensing: What Is Considered Fair Use?” on CCC’s Velocity of Content blog.

Additional “Using Music at Work” Webinar Summaries and Recaps

Here is my recap of 25 key music licensing points I shared during the webinar, 25 Key Points about Using Music in Your Business. For more details and examples of these key points, you can listen to a recording of the entire 1-hour “Using Music at Work” webinar at http://go.copyright.com/l/37852/2017-02-24/cg7t1z