• The UK will save more than £450m a year and instead spend £149m a year on regulation after Brexit, with 1,500 staff needed to re-establish EU agencies and institutions domestically, according to a new report. Fieldfisher, the European law firm, studied the future of 69 bodies that currently oversee the UK in various ways. It believes the UK will need to maintain strategic partnerships with at least seven EU agencies because their functions cannot be decentralised — for example to ensure air safety, security and gas and electricity transport networks. This is likely to cost about £35m a year if current arrangements are continued. (The FT)
  • Ireland’s deputy prime minister and foreign minister has said he believes a Brexit deal on the Irish border question is “doable”, and confirmed that his government had held talks on the subject with Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist party. Simon Coveney said a breakthrough was possible before Theresa May’s crunch meeting with Jean-Claude Juncker on Monday, when Britain has to table satisfactory offers on three issues to progress to the next phase of negotiations. (The Guardian)
  • Ireland’s foreign minister has insisted that talks on a post-Brexit trade agreement cannot proceed unless Britain guarantees a solution to the Irish border question that would likely require Northern Ireland to remain inside the EU’s customs union. Simon Coveney, who was also promoted to the post of deputy prime minister on Thursday, told the BBC’s Today programme that the UK needs “to give reassurance that there will not be regulatory divergence between the two jurisdictions on the island of Ireland”. (The FT)
  • It is not possible to see how the Irish border issue can be resolved after Brexit, the influential group of MPs scrutinising the process has said. The government wants no hard border between the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland and no customs border between the latter and the rest of the UK. Ministers have suggested technology could enable a “frictionless border”. But the Committee for Exiting the EU said the proposals were “untested” and “to some extent speculative”. (BBC)
  • The UK’s manufacturers had their best month since August 2013 in November, according to the latest survey snapshot of the sector. The Purchasing Managers’ Index jumped to 58.2 in the month, up from 56.6 in October and well above the 56.5 that City of London analysts had expected. Any reading above 50 signals growth. Overseas orders were up strongly, suggesting the slump in the pound since the Brexit vote is helping producers, as well as the cyclical recovery in mainland Europe, our biggest trading partner. The total orders balance was 60.9, the highest since November 2013. (The Independent)