Where nation states fail to provide necessary environmental regulations, multinationals step up and fill that gap. After all, multinationals are best situated to make a positive impact on the environment through socially conscious initiatives and data-driven decision-making. But how can companies accelerate change in their respective industries?

Joining us today to share her insight is Susan Jackson, president of the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF), a global partnership among scientists, tuna processors, and environmental nonprofits to undertake science-based initiatives for the long-term conservation and sustainable use of tuna stocks, reducing bycatch and promoting a healthy marine ecosystem.

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What We Discuss in This Episode:

What the ISSF is and how it came to exist

How the environmental community, scientists, and the tuna processing industries came together to establish more sustainable tuna fisheries

Since tuna fish swim around in various waters, which nations are responsible for managing them?

Why existing international organizations, like the IATTC and the ICAT, which are responsible for the conservation and management of tuna, got slogged down

Are there disagreements among scientists when it comes to tuna stock assessment methods and data gaps?

The beauty in finding NGO’s that believe that businesses can be change agents

What best practices and conversations are being exchanged between scientists, NGO’s, Industry, and companies in order to create a more socially conscious supply chain

Some of the greatest challenges of ISSF initiatives

Can other industries adopt similar initiatives and models that will accelerate change?

Resources Mentioned:

World Wildlife Fund

IATTC

ICAT 

WCPFC