We previously reported on the Supreme Court’s invitation to the Solicitor General to weigh in on whether the Court should grant certiorari in an important case involving the pleading standards in FCA cases. U.S. ex rel. Nathan v. Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc., et al., Dkt. No. 12-1349 (Oct. 7, 2013). In a recent brief, the Solicitor General argued that since the issue of whether a relator must identify specific false claims in order to meet the pleading requirements of 9(b) is still being considered by various lower courts, the Court should decline to grant certiorari at this time.

The brief sheds light on the government’s view of the overarching role of 9(b) and the FCA. The government’s central position is that adoption of a per se rule that a relator must plead the details of particular false claims—rather than plead allegations supporting a “plausible inference” that false claims were submitted—could undercut the FCA’s role as a fraud-fighting tool. The Solicitor General argued that asking relators to identify specific claims is neither plausible or useful, conceding that many relators may not be aware of specific claims. Rather, the Solicitor General argued, the role of a relator is properly to “bring[] to light other information that shows those claims to be false.”

Thus, the government’s position appears to be 9(b) should be construed so as to aid the government’s fraud-fighting efforts. This approach is difficult to square with the longstanding view of 9(b) as a means to provide notice to defendants of potential fraud claims and prevent frivolous or vexatious litigation. We will continue to monitor this important case.