• Nexen announced it has completed a three-well program in the Horn River area, each having a higher fracture density than earlier wells. The company believes its land, consisting of roughly 88,000 acres in the Dilly Creek area, could support between 500 to 700 wells. Currently the company is pumping between 15 mmcfpd to 20 mmcfpd from five wells. Nexen announced it is "making excellent progress in reducing costs and increasing well productivity" on its Horn River shale gas acreage. The company estimates its lands contain about 500 mmbbl to 1 bbbl of oil equivalent of contingent recoverable resource.
  • Quicksilver Resources announced it has completed its first well in the Horn River Basin. The well tested at 13 mmcfpd and averaged 10 mmcfpd in its first month of production. The company announced it anticipates "drilling longer laterals with additional stages of fracture stimulation" which is expected to "result in even greater production per well."
  • EnCana announced it believes there is roughly 500 trillion cubic feet "of original gas in place in the (Horn River) basin" shale play in British Columbia. According to data from the U.S. Department of Energy, this would make the Horn River discovery the third largest in north America after the Marcellus shale and Haynesville shale. The company also commented that the geology in the Horn River is better than other shale plays as production declines at the slower rate of only 50% in a year.