A previous post provided the first two reasons that accurate minutes are a “must” for all non-profits, including homeowners associations, churches, unions, sororities, and political parties. Here’s two more pieces of parliamentary procedure guidance to protect you legally and help you proceed efficiently as a group:

Minutes Protect against Baseless Accusation

The latest edition of Robert’s Rules advises that in addition to recording any actions taken, minutes should also, among other things, list the type of meeting (regular, special, etc.); the date, time, and place; any notice required for specific motions; and who was present.

You have two options on the “who was present” part of the record: Include names of everyone there, or in large assemblies where a list of individual members attending may not be practical, include a statement that “a quorum was present at the start of the meeting.”

We’re talking prudence here. For members interested in challenging actions that a governing body or organization has taken, quorum and notice are easy targets. Having minutes that are “air tight” on those factors goes a long way toward quieting any accusation that “you didn’t tell us about the meeting” or “you voted on ____ without enough people there.”

As noted in Part 1, well-kept minutes can also assist in IRS or other governmental investigations. Minutes are key evidence of an organization’s compliance with laws and regulations regarding meetings and governance. Being able to demonstrate that your board, committees, and organization met at regular intervals, with a sufficient number of members present, and took lawful action related to your mission is key to answering inquiries and alleviating compliance concerns.

Minutes Provide a Basis for Future Action

Finally, minutes are an extremely helpful tickler file. What’s happening next for your group? What decisions should be delayed? When do we have a deadline? Minutes aren’t merely a record of how much money the board decided to spend on new iPads for the staff. They’re a reminder of which motions were referred to which committees, and when those committees are slated to report back.

Minutes are also suggestive of topics that the group wasn’t ready to discuss. Hint: Look for motions that were postponed indefinitely, postponed to the next meeting, or tabled. And they’re a roadmap for guiding future discussion. Think: What specific steps can we take at the next meeting on that strategic plan that we put in place six months ago?

In sum, taking minutes might be laborious (and thankless), but doing the job and doing it well will both keep your organization out of trouble and help it move forward efficiently.

See all 4 No-Nonsense Reasons to Take Good Minutes