California Governor Jerry Brown approved sweeping new rules for the state’s assisted living facilities on September 28, 2014. The rules require residential care facilities for the elderly to meet new training and staffing requirements, remedy licensing deficiencies within ten days of notification, provide quarterly financial statements, and pay additional annual licensure fees, among other changes. 

Governor Brown signed the following bills:

  • SB 911: Increases training requirements for administrators of residential care facilities for the elderly and certain direct care staff members who assist with specific tasks.
  • SB 1153: Permits suspension of new admissions to a residential care facility that has engaged in violations that constitute a risk to the health and safety of residents.
  • SB 1382: Increases residential care facility for the elderly annual licensure fees.
  • SB 895: Requires residential care facilities for the elderly to remedy licensing deficiencies within 10 days of notification. Also requires the California Department of Social Services to post online how residents and families can obtain inspection reports for residential care facilities for the elderly.
  • AB 1570: Increases training requirements for licensees and direct care staff of residential care facilities for the elderly.
  • AB 1751: Requires resident representation on governing boards of residential care facilities for the elderly and quarterly reporting of financial statements.
  • AB 1899: Prohibits the reinstatement of a license for licensees of residential care facilities for the elderly who abandon a facility, resulting in a threat to the residents’ health and safety.
  • AB 2044: Enacts additional staffing and health and safety requirements at residential care facilities for the elderly.
  • AB 2171: Establishes statutory rights for residents of privately operated residential care facilities for the elderly and requires that there rights be displayed in the facility.
  • AB 2231: Reestablishes a program to provide property tax deferment to seniors and disabled persons.

Several proposals that were part of the Residential Care Facility for the Elderly Reform Act of 2014, however, did not make it through the legislative process. In particular, AB 1571, which would have created an online consumer information system, and AB 1554, which would have required expedited complaint investigations, failed in the Senate.