On June 8, 2017, the House passed H.R. 10, the Financial “CHOICE” Act with a vote of 233 to 186. Introduced on April 27, 2017, the Financial CHOICE Act proposes to amend the Dodd-Frank Act to repeal the Volcker Rule, eliminate the FDIC’s orderly liquidation authority, and repeal certain limitations imposed by the Durbin Amendment. The bill would also remove FSOC’s authority to designate non-bank financial institutions and financial market utilities as “systemically important” (also known as “too big to fail”).

Furthermore, in addition to the numerous amendments to the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010, the bill intends to (1) modify provisions related to the SEC’s managerial structure and enforcement authority; (2) eliminate the Office of Financial Research within the Department of the Treasury; and (3) revise provisions related to capital formation, insurance regulation, civil penalties for securities laws violations, and community financial institutions.

The bill would also repeal the Department of Labor’s fiduciary rule which, when fully implemented, significantly expands the categories of persons considered fiduciaries. The DOL would be prohibited from adopting any similar rule until after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) adopts a fiduciary standard for broker-dealers.

Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, Jeb Hensarling, said in a statement after the passing of the bill: “We will make sure there is needed regulatory relief for our small banks and credit unions, because it’s our small banks and credit unions that lend to our small businesses that are the jobs engine of our economy and make sure the American dream is not a pipe dream.”

For a summary of current pending legislation relating to capital formation, click here.