The Supreme Court of the United States announced decisions in two cases today:

POM Wonderful LLC v. Coca-Cola Co, No. 12-761: Petitioner POM Wonderful LLC produces, markets, and sells a pomegranate-blueberry juice blend. POM brought a suit under §43 of the Lanham Act against respondent Coca-Cola Company, alleging that the name, label, marketing, and advertising of one of Coca-Cola’s juice blends mislead customers into believing that it consists predominantly of pomegranate and blueberry juice, when it actually consists of only 0.3% pomegranate juice and 0.2% blueberry juice. The District Court granted partial summary judgment to Coca-Cola, holding that the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA), which prohibits the misbranding of food and drink, and its corresponding regulations by the Food and Drug Administration, preclude Lanham Act challenges to the name and label of Coca-Cola’s juice blend. The Ninth Circuit affirmed. Today, the Court reversed, holding that competitors, in their own interest, may bring Lanham Act claims like POM’s that challenge food and beverage labels that are regulated by the FDCA.

The Court's decision is available here.

Clark v. Rameker, No. 13-299: Petitioners filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and sought to exclude approximately $300,000 in an inherited individual retirement account (IRA) from the bankruptcy estate under the “retirement funds” exemption in 11 U.S.C. §522(b)(3)(C). The Bankruptcy Court disallowed the exception, determining that an inherited IRA does not share the same characteristics as a traditional IRA. The District Court reversed, but the Seventh Circuit then reversed the District Court. The Court today affirmed, holding that funds contained in an inherited IRA do not qualify as “retirement funds” within the meaning of this bankruptcy exemption.

The Court's decision is available here.