Intellectual property in the life sciences is one of the most innovative and complex areas of law. It is currently undergoing a period of transformation, with companies adjusting to a changing legal and regulatory landscape and rapid changes in technology.

In particular, new developments in medicine are testing the conventional exclusivity rights protection on which the industry hinges, and the courts are adapting enforcement measures in new ways to keep up.

Authored by Paul England and Simon Cohen (with contributors), A User's Guide to Intellectual Property in the Life Sciences covers life sciences in relation to patents, trade secrets, trade marks and copyright, and regulatory rights, as well as assessing the impact of data protection law and Brexit in this sector.

The book covers UK law with references to significant EPO cases. A key part of the book is the coverage of case law. Case studies and detailed analysis of the key cases (eg the Kymab mouse case, the human genome sciences case, and the pregabalin case) feature heavily, helping to put this often complex area of law into context.

Where appropriate and for comparison purposes, approaches of key foreign jurisdictions are summarised and for ease of use these are clearly signposted.

Coming in 2020, this is a key text for practitioners specialising in life sciences and intellectual property in general, and those working in-house in the life sciences sector, helping them to negotiate the issues.