In yet another decision that exhibits the current Board’s overreaching and expansive view of its jurisdiction, the Board recently ruled that nurses who supervise and assign other hospital staff are not statutory supervisors.

A Position Expressly Created to be Supervisory is Not Supervisory, According to the Board

In 2016, Lakewood Health Center (“Lakewood”) restructured its staffing system and replaced charge nurses with a newly created position, Patient Care Coordinator (“PCC”). According to the uncontradicted testimony of Lakewood Vice-President of Patient Care Danielle Abel, the hospital created this new position for one specific reason – “to ensure accountability for shift-by-shift work flow of the department….in addition to supervising the employees on their shift.” According to the job description, a PCC “provides overall supervision of staff and patient care,” is “responsible for daily nursing assignments,” and “retains overall accountability for the work flow for their shift, and remains accountable if duties are delegated to another qualified staff member.” Abel testified, without contradiction, that PCCs must assess the patient’s needs and the nurses’ skills when assigning nurses to patient care tasks and are accountable for the nurses’ performance. The undisputed evidence further showed that PCCs were the highest ranking authority present evenings, nights and weekends and, for the majority of the time, the only person present with the authority to assign and direct nurses. The Minnesota Nurses Association filed an election petition asserting that the PCCs should be included in the bargaining unit, thereby adding one more dues-paying classification to the potential bargaining unit.

In a terse one-page decision, the Board characterized the undisputed evidence as vague and conclusory and found that Lakewood failed to provide tangible examples demonstrating the PCCs’ supervisory authority. Although Abel testified that PCCs were accountable for assigning and supervising nurses, the Board dismissed her testimony as “simply a conclusion without evidentiary value.” The Board likewise discounted Abel’s testimony that PCCs exercise independent judgment when assigning nurses because no one testified that the nurses have differing levels of skill and ability and, for most of the shifts in evidence, there was only one nurse available, stating that independent judgment cannot be established if there is “only one obvious choice.”

Miscimarra’s Scathing Dissent Exposes the Flaws in the Board’s Decision

Board member Miscimarra’s dissent harshly rebuked the majority’s decision as abstract, thinly supported and inconsistent with the undisputed evidence. Miscimarra noted that both the PCC job description and Abel’s testimony established, without contradiction, that PCCs were accountable for assigning and responsibly directing subordinate nurses. In fact, according to Abel’s unrefuted testimony, the very reason that Lakewood created this new position was to impose accountability for patient care and staffing issues on a single person. Miscimarra strongly criticized the majority for “disregard[ing] unrebutted evidence merely because it could have been stronger, more detailed, or supported by more specific examples,” particularly given that the PCC position was created a mere four months prior to the hearing. He also noted that the Board apparently and unreasonably wanted specific testimony “to establish the commonsense fact that some employees are more skilled than others” and chastised the majority for ignoring the practical reality that the PCC is often the highest ranking person present at Lakewood, explaining that “[s]omeone has to be in charge at this facility at all times.” Miscimarra ended his dissent with a biting, but particularly apt, reproach that “the finding that PCCs are not supervisors under Section 2(11) provides yet another illustration of the principle that ‘common sense’ is not so common.”

Employers Must Be Prepared

This decision stands as a stark reminder that employers must be prepared with documentation, examples and other specific evidence supporting supervisory determinations to combat the hostile and skeptical review of the current Board. This decision also signals that 2017 will be no different than 2016 for the Board – it will continue to issue decisions that assail employer’s rights and bolster its relevancy even when it flies in the face of common sense and basic workplace practicalities.