• The United Auto Workers Local 2121 and Mashantucket Pequot Gaming Enterprise have reached a tentative first contract covering 2,500 casino dealers at the Foxwoods Resort Casino and MGM Grand located on an Indian reservation in Mashantucket, Connecticut. The 23-month tentative contract, which is the first in the country negotiated under tribal law, would raise dealer wages by 30 cents on March 1, by 10 cents on January 1, 2011, and by 30 cents on March 1, 2011 resulting in a 12 percent wage increase over the term of the contract. If ratified, the contract will also establish an “industry model” for job safety, provide job security and a dealer career path, establish a more equitable distribution of tips, expand maximum sick leave for serious illness, establish seniority provisions, and create a grievance and arbitration procedure.
  • 1,100 members of the Graphic Communications Conference of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 406 overwhelmingly rejected a three-year labor contract proposal from Newsday. Prior to the vote union leaders urged members to turn down the company’s proposal which called for a 10 percent across-the-board wage cut, an increase from a 35 hour workweek to a 40 hour workweek, and less paid vacation. Newsday maintains that such concessions are necessary because the newspaper is losing business. The day after union members voted against the proposed contract, Newsday amended its severance policy resulting in a reduction in the amount of severance pay available to laid-off workers.
  • Members of the Air Line Pilots Association at Hawaiian Airlines ratified a new 68-month labor contract for more than 400 pilots. The new contract, which took nearly three years to negotiate, will result in an immediate pay increase of either 4 percent or 6.1 percent, depending on the type of aircraft flown. Four additional pay increases ranging from 2 percent to 6 percent will take effect at 14-month intervals throughout the duration of the contract. The airline also agreed to increase contributions to pilots’ defined contribution pension plan. Current pilots will also retain health care benefits; newly hired employees will be required to serve for 10 years before becoming eligible for employer-provided health care benefits after retirement.
  • Members of Utility Workers Union Local 127 ratified a labor contract with the Rocky Mountain Power Co. that covers 577 employees working at three coal-fired plants in Wyoming. The nearly four-year contract will raise wages 6.25 percent over term. Under the new contract, employees are entitled to an immediate 1.25 percent increase, followed by 1.5 percent increases in September 2010 and September 2011, followed by a 2 percent increase in September 2012. Employee contributions to health care premiums will more than double over term with an increase from 12.5 percent to 20 percent in the first year, followed by increases to 25 percent in the third year and 30 percent in the fourth year. Employee co-payments and deductibles remain unchanged.
  • Collective bargaining data compiled by BNA through January 11 for all settlements.
  • showed that the average first-year wage increase was 2.7 percent, compared with 3.4 percent reported in the comparable period of 2009. The median first-year increase for contracts reported to date in 2010 was 2.4 percent, compared with 3 percent in 2009; the weighted average was 1.9 percent, compared with 5.8 percent in the same period in 2009. Manufacturing, unlike other industries, reported an average wage increase from 0.4 percent in 2009 to 1.8 percent in 2010; the median was 2 percent, compared with 0 percent in 2009.
  • All-settlements data representing 950 agreements and more than 1.1 million workers show that the average first-year wage increase under contracts negotiated in 2009 was 2.3 percent, compared with 3.6 percent in 2008. The average second-year increase reported in 2009 was 2.6 percent, compared with 3.4 percent in 2008, and the average third-year increase was 2.8 percent, compared with 3.3 percent in 2008. Changes to benefits occurred in 42 percent of all settlements reported. Changes to pension plans were reported in 52 percent of all settlements.
  • Major collective bargaining agreements in Canada during November produced average wage increases of 2 percent, compared to 2.2 percent in October. The data was compiled from 15 agreements covering 39,180 employees. The lowest private sector wage increase was recorded at Prevost Car Inc. in Quebec, where 970 employees received a wage increase of .3 percent, including a wage freeze in the first year of the contract. The highest wage increase was recorded at Construction Management Bureau Ltd. in Nova Scotia, where 800 electrical workers received a wage increase of 2.5 percent.