It is probably fair to say that fans of 'The Apprentice' have all been waiting with bated breath for “Dr Leah”, winner of 2013’s show to open her cosmetic surgery clinics. Much was made of her business plan when she sat in the board room in front of Lord Sugar and, with the growing cosmetic surgery industry, it seemed to some a genius idea and one that was sure to make lots of money.

Dr Leah’s idea did, however, come with a lot of criticism from those already in the industry, particularly in the wake of Sir Bruce Keogh’s report and existing concerns about the lack of regulation within the industry.

Mr Graeme Perks, President of the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS), said: “At a time when all professionals are collaborating with Sir Bruce Keogh to improve cosmetic surgery practice and protect the vulnerable, it is a concern that a very junior doctor can make claims to be an authority in this field and provide the direction and clinical judgement that only comes with experience. The results of the BBC's 'The Apprentice' provide yet another reason why Parliament must act fast.”

Dr Leah has now answered her critics in the wake of opening her much anticipated clinic. The main concern the industry had about these clinics was the fact they would be run by a junior doctor who may perhaps not have enough experience. In order to silence her critics, Dr Leah she has put together a team including Lorna Bowes, registered Nurse and Clinical Excellence Leader to ensure that  delivers the best in clinical standards and protocols. Also on the team is Taimur Shoaib, a BAPRAS surgeon.

While Dr Leah is a young business woman, the treatments being offered at Dr Leah Clinics are not being advertised for young girls but instead are aimed at the city worker ‘who wants premium anti-ageing and skin health treatments in a clinical environment’. The treatments being offered are basic but focussed and include anti-wrinkle injections, dermal fillers and skin peels.

Amy Milner, associate in the Penningtons Manches clinical negligence team, comments: “In a largely unregulated industry where the number of procedures carried out is on the rise, our concern is that the number of potential errors will also increase. It is fair to say that Dr Leah’s idea may have given those in the industry some cause for concern that these clinics would simply fuel the ongoing problems and concerns. That said, while some may argue Dr Leah is “too young”, she has come into this industry with an extremely level head and has got on board the best team to ensure all procedures are carried out to a high standard and all patients are suitable.

"Given the increase in popularity for cosmetic procedures, it is important that people are educated and go to the right people. We are seeing an increasing number of those with poor outcomes following cosmetic surgery and we hope that this highly publicised clinic will educate people about the types of procedures being offered and that people  will not rush in to going under the knife.”