What happens when you are involved in litigation where a party’s interests (either your client or the other side’s) are represented by litigation friend who refuses to cooperate with you or other people involved in the case?

In many cases, surely the answer is simply to apply to the court for the recalcitrant litigation friend to be replaced for the best interests of the protected litigant. However it is clear that notwithstanding the manifest damage being caused by an uncooperative litigation friend, their removal may be anticipated to do more harm than good.

Such was the case in M (a child by his father & litigation friend) v LB of Lambeth (Defendant / Pt 20 Claimant) & Hyde Southbank Homes Ltd (Pt 20 Defendant) [2014] EWHC 57 (QB).

Here C had suffered a serious injury after falling from a window, aged four. His own medical expert stated that C had probably suffered a brain injury and there was "significant brain impairment". However, the defendant's experts stated that C's impairments "were consistent with his pre-injury functioning" and on balance were probably "secondary to his inherent pattern of development and may have been contributed to by social and cultural factors". In short, the experts were poles apart.

C’s litigation friend was no longer prepared to co-operate with medical experts and was not amenable to putting in place the support recommended for C. He and C’s mother had instructed C's solicitor to settle the claim as soon as possible.

Sensibly worried about the situation they found themselves in, C's solicitors sought the court's guidance upon whether the litigation fiend’s appointment should be terminated, and whether the case should be settled even though it remained unclear whether C had suffered a brain injury and what his disabilities might be in the future.

However, the Court held that as the litigation friend was also C’s father, even should a new litigation friend be appointed, it would be unlikely that C’s parents would become any less uncooperative as they were being presently and would probably continue to hinder C’s best interests.

Against this background, it was held that the best (or perhaps the “least worse”) course in this particular case was for C’s solicitors to seek to negotiate settlement on the basis of the existing medical and other evidence, as instructed by C’s father and current litigation friend.

Clearly this was a far from ideal position for either C or indeed the Defendant Party. Without greater clarity as to C’s medical position there was inescapably a risk of significant injustice to both sides. However when faced with such an unusual situation, the Court held there was little positive it could do, rather than risk making the position worse. This must have weighed heavily upon Mr Justice Tugendhat’s mind when he later came to approve the settlement the Parties reached.