The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia today released its decision for the most part rejecting the appeals of webcasters of the 2007 decision of the Copyright Royalty Board setting Internet Radio royalty rates for the use of sound recordings. The Court generally upheld the Board's decision, finding that the issues raised by the appealing parties did not show that the decision was "arbitrary and capricious" - a high standard of judicial review that the Courts accord when reviewing supposedly "expert" administrative agency decisions. On only one issue did the Court have concerns with the CRB's decision - that being the question of the $500 per channel minimum fees that it had required that webcasters pay. The Court found that per channel fee, which could result in astronomical fees for some webcasters regardless of their listenership, was not supported by the record evidence, and remanded that aspect of the case to the CRB for further consideration.

The Court surprised some observers by not reaching the constitutional issue of whether the Copyright Royalty Judges were properly appointed. As we wrote before (see our posts here and here), issues were raised by appellant Royalty Logic, contending that these Judges should be appointed by the President, and not by the Librarian of Congress. In the recent Court decision on the CRB rates for satellite radio, where the issue had not even been raised, one Judge nevertheless wrote that he questioned the constitutionality of the CRB. The Court here decided not to decide the issue - finding that it had been raised too late by Royalty Logic, and raised too many fundamental issues (including whether the Register of Copyrights should herself be appointed by the President, potentially invalidating many copyrights) to be decided on the minimal briefing accorded it by the parties.

This decision really just delays the consideration of the issue of the constitutionality of the CRB. Now that this issue is on the table, it is bound to be raised by other parties in other CRB proceedings. Thus, as the CRB embarks on its consideration of the webcasting royalty rates for 2011-2015, there is a cloud hanging over its existence - one that may take another Court decision, or some corrective action by Congress, to remedy.