• Beginning in January, all Oklahoma oil and gas well operators undergoing hydraulic fracturing are required to report the chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing. Previously, this requirement only applied to operators of horizontal wells, but is now extended to cover all wells. Reports must be made on the website FracFocus.org or to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.
  • Following certain Colorado cities' ban of fracking or oil and gas development, Colorado proposed state-wide rules to regulate and reduce airborne emissions. But the industry is fighting back. The Colorado Oil & Gas Association has filed lawsuits against the City of Fort Collins, asserting that it does not have the authority to ban fracking within the city limits. Similarly, COGA filed a suit against Lafayette, Colo., which has banned all oil and gas development within its city limits.
  • As drilling in the Barnet Shale play has slowed, Dallas adopted one of the most restrictive ordinances, which increases the prior 300-foot setback around gas wells to a 1500-foot setback requirement. The Texas Railroad Commission announced that it is hiring a seismologist to gather evidence and data regarding the possible causation between oil and gas activities and seismic events. In the announcement, the Commission stated that its "rules and regulations must be based on sound science and proven facts."
  • The Energy and Environment Committee of the Kansas House held hearings in January regarding the potential connection of hydraulic fracturing to increased seismic activity. Officials of the Kansas Geological Survey presented at the hearing. Meanwhile, the Oklahoma Geological Society is also investigating the seismic activity in Oklahoma and the connection to oil and gas development, focusing on the disposal wells, which it identifies as the "biggest risk".
  • Coloradans for Responsible Energy Development launched a new website, StudyFracking.com, as an informational resource to answer questions about fracking in Colorado. CRED is backed by Anadarko Petroleum Corp. and Noble Energy Inc., which launched this website one day after MoveOn, a liberal advocacy group, announced plans to fund anti-fracking activists in Colorado.