• United Auto Workers’ (“UAW”) president Bob King recently stated that the UAW would increase its efforts to organize Nissan Motor Co.’s United States workers, including through protest activities aimed at pressuring Nissan to agree to what the Union considers “fair” election processes. In particular, King stated that the UAW would protest Nissan at the Chicago Auto Show and other auto shows, and warned that UAW protests would hurt the Nissan brand. King asserted the UAW’s efforts would intensify until the company agreed to a process where its workers could decide whether to unionize.
  • GKN Aerospace Monitor manufacturing employees in Amityville, NY, voted 110-88 to be represented by the International Association of Machinists (“IAM”). Certification of the election results remains pending as the National Labor Relations Board is investigating numerous objections to the vote. GKN workers previously rejected IAM representation in two prior elections. The IAM trumpeted this win as a “decisive organizing victory.”
  • Kaiser Permanente employees in California will vote (starting April 5) over whether to continue representation by the SEIU-affiliated United Healthcare Workers West, or to elect the National Union of Healthcare Workers (“NUHW”), an affiliate of the California Nurses Association. A prior 2010 election between the same two unions was set aside after the NLRB determined that United Healthcare, the winner by nearly 7,000 votes, improperly interfered with the election. The NUHW is trying to drum up support by promising not to go along with employer-proposed cuts to pension and retiree benefits that the United Healthcare union has agreed to allow.
  • The National Federation of Nurses (“NFN”), representing approximately 34,000 nurses in Washington, Ohio, Oregon, and Montana, voted to become affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers. The NFN joined the larger teachers union to enhance its power and influence. A representative for the American Federation of Nurses noted that 80 percent of registered nurses in the United States are not unionized and opined that by partnering with the largest AFL-CIO affiliated professional union, the NFN more effectively increase that number.
  • Approximately 650 workers for IC Bus, located in Tulsa, Oklahoma, chose representation by the UAW through an agreed card check recognition process. The UAW began its organizing efforts in January 2013, in accord with a card check agreement reached with IC Bus’s parent company, Navistar International Corp. The UAW represents approximately 2,600 Navistar employees in Indiana, Illinois, Georgia, Texas, Arkansas, and Pennsylvania.
  • In an effort to displace the incumbent Transport Workers Union, the Airline Division of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (“IBT” or “Teamsters”) announced that a majority of mechanics and maintenance workers for American Airlines have signed cards to be represented by the Teamsters. The workers span 14 American Airlines maintenance facilities from Los Angeles to New York. The Teamsters stated they will continue gathering signature cards and soon request a representation election with the National Mediation Board. In response, president James Little of the incumbent Transport Workers Union accused the Teamsters of “raiding” and engaging in a misinformation campaign.
  • The UAW staged protests at Flex-N-Gate facilities in Urbana, Illinois, Belvidere, Illinois, Grand Rapids, Michigan, Warren, Michigan, Veedersburg, Indiana, Salem, Ohio, and Arlington, Texas. Flex-N-Gate manufactures bumpers and other parts for a number of auto companies, including Ford, Toyota, and General Motors. The protestors called for pay increases and safer workplaces. Flex-N-Gates’ Warren, Michigan and Belvidere, Illinois locations are union plants. The UAW has been attempting to organize at the non-union plants for the last year, and the UAW called for the company to allow workers to organize at these plants without intimidation. UAW members at the unionized plants are currently in negotiations for a new labor contract, and Union leaders at those facilities said they will strike if necessary.
  • The NUHW withdrew a pending challenge to a 2009 representation election in which the NUHW lost to the SEIU-affiliated United Healthcare Workers in an effort to represent approximately 10,000 home healthcare employees in California. In challenging the 2009 election results, the NUHW had alleged that its rival intimidated voters and manipulated ballots. After the NUHW announced the withdrawal of its challenge, a United Healthcare Workers representative said the NUHW had engaged in a “four-year public relations stunt” and had no evidence to support any of its assertions.