On May 10, 2017, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memorandum ordering all federal prosecutors, in all criminal cases, to “charge and pursue the most serious, readily provable offense,” and to “disclose to the sentencing court all facts that impact the sentencing guidelines or mandatory minimum sentences.” The new policy – which immediately rescinds Obama-era leniency policies – is likely primarily aimed at drug-related cases, but it will impact white collar and FCPA cases as well. For instance, under the policy, prosecutors may charge more defendants with money laundering or wire fraud in addition to FCPA violations, taking into account the FCPA’s relatively low five-year maximum sentences. Prosecutors seeking an exception must secure supervisory approval and document their reasoning in the case file, which may complicate plea deals. In a May 12 speech, Sessions said of the new policy: “Charging and sentencing recommendations are bedrock responsibilities of any prosecutor. And I trust our prosecutors in the field to make good judgments. They deserve to be unhandcuffed and not micro-managed from Washington.”