People need to be educated on how to manage self-driving cars before problems arise.

Autonomous vehicles will certainly be on the move in 2018, and we are sure to see an uptick in accidents. They won’t be your run-of-the-mill car crashes. Instead of questioning parties involved and witnesses when all is said and done, experts will analyse information by downloading data contained in the car’s “black box” as the principal means of reconstructing an accident.

The recent introduction of the Tesla Model 3, the more affordable version of the iconic luxury car, is slated to roll out in early 2018, and will make the autonomous vehicle ubiquitous on the roads. At around $35K, the Model 3’s pre-orders are currently at nearly 500,000, but will people know how to properly use them?

The World Economic Forum states that autonomous driving features will help prevent 9 percent of accidents by 2025 with the potential to save 900,000 lives in the next 10 years. This is great news, but there will be a learning curve before this new safety shift comes about. While the self-driving feature is a great one that is clearly predicted to make lives easier, people need to be educated on how to manage these cars before problems arise.

Understanding autonomous vehicles and what they are and are not capable of is key to getting to this safer driving environment.