On September 18, 2017, the iconic US-based retailer Toys “R” Us filed for Chapter 11 in the US Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in front of Judge Keith L. Phillips. The company filed twenty-five entities, explaining that its $5.3 billion debt obligations and operational issues had led to the need for reorganization.

The company’s Canadian subsidiary also began parallel proceedings under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA) in Canada. Meanwhile, the Company’s operations outside of the U.S. and Canada, including its approximately 255 licensed stores and joint venture partnership in Asia, which are separate entities, are not part of the Chapter 11 filing or CCAA proceedings.

Since the company went private in 2005 it has had approximately $400M of annual debt service payments- these obligations have inhibited reinvestment in the core operations of the business.

The company is optimistic that Chapter 11 offers an opportunity for Toys “R” Us to deleverage, relieve itself of unprofitable lease obligations, and invest back into their business in the U.S. and Canada. At present the company has a total of $3.1 billion of DIP financing, including two $450 million term loans and a $1.85 billion revolver.

The Company intends to pay vendors in full under normal terms for goods and services delivered on or after the filing date. As the Company’s international subsidiaries are not part of the Chapter 11 filings and CCAA proceedings, Toys “R” Us’ international subsidiaries will pay vendors for all goods and services in the normal course.